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BMW Recalls a Handful of iX and i4 EVs Over Potential Battery Fires

What's happening

BMW has issued a recall on 83 iX SUVs and i4 sedans.

Why it matters

These cars could catch fire if unfixed.

BMW has issued a recall on its iX and i4 all-electric vehicles. And while the risk is rather concerning -- fires are scary, after all, particularly those of the EV variety -- this issue is isolated to just 83 vehicles.

56 BMW iX SUVs and a further 27 BMW i4 sedans are named in the recall for having potentially damaged high-voltage batteries. Those are the big batteries that provide the car's range: 111.5 kilowatt-hours in the iX and 83.9 in the i4. Damage to the batteries could result in a fire, so BMW is not only recommending owners not charge them, but it's saying they shouldn't even drive their vehicles. You can read the full details of the recall (PDF).

2023 BMW iX M60 Has More Power, Same Style

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The fix? BMW will do a battery pack swap on all the affected vehicles, free of charge. Official letters won't be hitting mailboxes until Sept. 19, but according to Autoblog, which spotted the recall over the weekend, BMW is already reaching out to the affected folks.

This is a little more extreme than the major recalls that impacted the Chevrolet Bolt and Bolt EUVs. Bolt owners were still allowed to charge, but were told to only do so outside. They were also told to always supervise their car while charging and to ensure they parked 50 feet away from any other vehicle. Bolt recalls lingered for months, with GM even stopping production of the vehicles until April of this year.

With any luck this recall will be cleaned up far more quickly and everyone can get back to enjoying BMW's SUVs and sedans. After all, they're pretty great to drive.

Tim Stevens Former editor at large for CNET Cars
Tim Stevens got his start writing professionally while still in school in the mid '90s, and since then has covered topics ranging from business process management to video game development to automotive technology.
Tim Stevens
Tim Stevens got his start writing professionally while still in school in the mid '90s, and since then has covered topics ranging from business process management to video game development to automotive technology.

Article updated on August 1, 2022 at 8:27 AM PDT

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Tim Stevens Former editor at large for CNET Cars
Tim Stevens got his start writing professionally while still in school in the mid '90s, and since then has covered topics ranging from business process management to video game development to automotive technology.
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