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Best Home EV Chargers for 2024

A Level 2 EV charger makes your electric vehicle even more convenient and cost-effective. Here are CNET's picks for the best at-home options.

$580 at Amazon
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Tesla Universal Wall Connector
Best home EV charger overall
$599 at Amazon
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ChargePoint Home Flex
Best EV charger overall runner-up
$350 at Amazon
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United Chargers Grizzl-E Classic
Best EV charger value, especially if it's going outdoors
$799 at Amazon
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United Chargers Grizzl-E Duo
Best EV charger for charging two cars
$599 at Amazon
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Autel MaxiCharger AC Elite Home 50A
Best EV charger with security features
$370 at Amazon
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Lectron V-Box Pro
Best no-frills home EV charger
$529 at Amazon
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Enel X Way JuiceBox 48
Best EV charger for green energy

You've bought an electric vehicle, maybe because of its lower emissions or maybe to save you money. Installing a Level 2 EV charger at home can unlock even greater convenience and, if it helps shift your charging away from public chargers, can boost your savings on fuel.

With numerous home charging stations on the market from various manufacturers offering a wide range of features and charging speeds, it can be hard to know which one is right for you. Plus, you'll have to make sure your home electrical system is ready to support EV charging. Over the last 15 years, I've evaluated and driven just about every mass-market electric vehicle ever sold in the US and even I have learned a lot over the last year while getting an EV charger setup at my home. That's why I've put together this guide to help you choose the best home EV charger for your needs.

I'll discuss the different types of chargers, the features you should look for, and the best chargers on the market. I'll also answer some common questions about preparing your home for EV charging. Whether you're a first-time EV or plug-in hybrid EV owner or you're just looking to upgrade your current charger, read on for all the information you need to choose the best home charging hardware for your home.

Tesla Wall Charger
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Tesla Wall Charger
Tesla

What is the best home EV charger for most drivers?

It shouldn't really be a surprise to find Tesla topping our list of best home EV chargers with its Universal Wall Connector. (After all, the automaker already tops our lists of best electric cars and SUVs with one of the best-selling cars of 2023, electric or otherwise.) The Universal flavor of the Wall Connector is a bit more expensive than the automaker's standard Wall Connector because it integrates both Tesla's NACS charging cable and J1772 adapter for non-Tesla cars into its compact chassis.

The Universal Wall Connector's design keeps the J1772 adapter locked onto either the cable's tip or into the charger's housing, so you won't accidentally lose or have to keep track of it. Users can easily swap between the two standards in seconds, which makes it ideal for households with multiple EVs, guests who show up with plug-in hybrids or owners looking to future-proof for the rest of the EV industry's eventual switch to the NACS standard in the US and Canada over the next few years.

With a 240-volt, 48-amp connection to your home's electrical system, this Level 2 charger can send up to 11.5 kilowatts of energy to a connected electric car. That's equivalent to around 44 miles of range per hour plugged in for a Tesla Model 3 or Model Y. Additionally, the Wi-Fi-connected charging station allows users to remotely monitor and schedule charging, control access (useful for outdoor installations) and supports Powershare bidirectional power for Tesla's Cybertruck

Best home EV chargers of 2024

Tesla

Like

  • Integrated NACS to J1772 adapter; remote monitoring and access control; 4 year warranty

Don't like

  • One of most expensive EVSE on this list

The Tesla Universal Wall Connector is a high-quality EV charger that is a solid pick for owners of Tesla and non-Tesla EVs thanks to its NACS connector and integrated J1772 adapter. Its Wi-Fi connection enables scheduled charging, remote monitoring, security settings and access control. It's also backed by a four-year warranty.

Specs

  • Connector: NACS and SAE J1772 (integrated adapter)
  • Cable length: 24 ft.
  • Output: up to 11.5 kW @ 48A, 240V
  • Warranty: 4 years
ChargePoint

Like

  • Extremely compact design; replaceable connector/cable; up to 50A (on a 60A circuit)

Don't like

  • Pricey

Chargepoint -- one of the oldest and largest EV charging networks in the nation -- brings its experience with EVSE hardware to your driveway with its compact Home Flex EV Charger. Users will have to choose between NACS and J1772 plugs at purchase, but the removable cable means that the Flex can be swapped between the standards with a simple replacement part if you ever change EVs. The Wi-Fi connected home station can be monitored and controlled, which is also helpful for finding and accessing public charging networks away from home.

Specs

  • Connector: SAE J1772 or NACS
  • Cable length: 23 ft.
  • Output: up to 12 kW @ 50A, 240V
  • Warranty: 3 years
United Chargers

Like

  • Rugged construction; low cost; simple design avoids software issues

Don't like

  • Plug-in only design

Canadian EVSE manufacturer United Chargers offers a Wi-Fi-enabled Grizzl-E Smart EV charger, but for the money, the no-frills Grizzl-E Classic is the better value. (The simpler unit also avoids many of the software issues users have experienced with the Smart during its first few years of availability.) Plus, it's built like a tank with its dustproof, fire-resistant aluminum case that's built to IP67 standards, which protects against full water immersion to one meter for 30 minutes.

The Classic is available with an SAE J1772 connector and three colorways for its rugged chassis. The unit is installed with a simple NEMA 14-50 or 6-50 plug and can be adjusted to accept 16-, 24-, 32- or 40-amp power at 240 volts, sending up 10 kilowatts maximum through its nice and long 25-foot cable. Plus, it comes with a three-year warranty for its $350 MSRP: not too shabby.

Specs

  • Connector: SAE J1772
  • Cable length: 24 ft.
  • Output: up to 10 kW @ 40A, 240V
  • Warranty: 3 years
United Chargers

Like

  • Everything that's great about the Grizzl-E Classic; plus charges two EVs on shared power

Don't like

  • Plug-in only design

You're not seeing double. Simply put, the Grizzl-E Duo builds on our Best Value Grizzl-E Classic with a second 24-foot cable and connector to charge two cars simultaneously. The Duo adds an intelligent power-sharing circuit to balance available current, up to 40 amps total, between the two charging cars according to their individual needs. That helps maximize charge speed for each vehicle without the risk of blowing a circuit or the inconvenience of cable swapping.

Specs

  • Connector: SAE J1772
  • Cable length: 24 ft. x 2
  • Output: up to 10 kW @ 40A, 240V
  • Warranty: 3 years
Autel Energy

Like

  • Up to 50A charging; available smartphone and RFID security; multiple installation options

Don't like

  • No native option for NACS connector

The MaxiCharger is a solidly built and flexible home EVSE. Users can choose between hardwired or outlet-connected installation. The box comes with either built-in or external plug holster configurations. The charger's output can also be controlled, monitored or adjusted over Wi-Fi, allowing it to easily accommodate homes that may not be able to reach its 50-amp maximum draw. (For example, I was able to cap it at 24 amps to fit safely within the limitations of my older home's power panel.) 

I especially like that the MaxiCharger can be locked and unlocked with either a smartphone app or RFID card, which means you can protect against strangers accessing an outdoor installation while easily granting a visiting friend or family member access simply by handing them an access card.

Specs

  • Connector: SAE J1772
  • Cable length: 25 ft.
  • Output: up to 12 kW @ 50A, 240V
  • Warranty: 3 years
Lectron

Like

  • No frills features make installation and use simple; attractive case design

Don't like

  • Shortest cable and warranty of the bunch; more expensive than Grizzl-E

Lectron's V-Box Pro Level 2 home charging station is very basic in its feature set. There's no Wi-Fi or Bluetooth connections to manage and no app integration. Heck, the installer adjusts the V-Box Pro's power output between 16, 32, 40 and 48 amps with a four-position knob located on the back panel. Keeping it simple allows Lectron to keep the V-Box Pro's price tag appropriately small, making it one of the most affordable Level 2 chargers on this list.

The 16-foot cable length is also the shortest of this bunch, so if there's extra room in your budget, you might consider upgrading to the larger, non-Pro V-Box model (yes, their naming convention is backward) model with its longer 20-foot cable and small LCD screen that displays real-time charging info. Personally, I don't think it's worth the extra $100.

Specs

  • Connector: SAE J1772 or NACS
  • Cable length: 16 ft.
  • Output: up to 11.5 kW @ 48A, 240V
  • Warranty: 1 year
Enel

Like

  • Optional software schedules charging around "green grid" energy sources; smartphone app and Amazon Alexa integration; multiple power levels for various budgets

Don't like

  • Green energy software costs extra

Enel X Way's JuiceBox 48 is the brand's newest, most powerful home EV charger, building on the same excellent design as its predecessors. This smart EVSE features Wi-Fi connectivity that enables charge scheduling and monitoring and remote voice control via Amazon Echo and Alexa integration. Enel X Way's software also enables users to schedule their charging around cheaper rates or, with a $50 JuiceNet Green software upgrade, sync their use around green grid generation sources. How well this works will depend on your region, but the feature promises to help ensure your EV's electricity doesn't come from "dirty" sources, like coal.

The 48-amp charging station can also be adjusted to accommodate 20- to 60-amp circuits via the Enel X Way app. If your needs are more conservative, consider the JuiceBox 32- or 40-amp versions, which are slightly less powerful at 7.7 kW and 9.6 kW, respectively, but also less expensive.

Specs

  • Connector: SAE J1772
  • Cable length: 25 ft.
  • Output: up to 11.5 kW @ 48A, 240V
  • Warranty: 3 years

Comparison of the best EV chargers for 2024


EVSEMax charge rateCable lengthHardwired or Plug-inNACS or J1772Phone appWarranty
Best overall home EV charger Tesla Universal Wall Connector11.5 kW @ 48A24 ftHardwiredBothYes4 years
Best home EV charger runner-up Chargepoint Home Flex12 kW @ 50A23 ftBothBothYes3 years
Best EV charger value United Chargers Grizzl-E Classic10 kW @ 40A24 ftPlug-inJ1772No3 years
Best dual EV charger United Chargers Grizzl-E Duo10 kW @ 40A24 ft x 2Plug-inJ1772No3 years
Best EV charger with security features Autel MaxiCharger AC Elite Home12 kW @ 50A25 ftBothJ1772Yes3 years
Best no-frills home EV charger Lectron V-Box Pro11.5 kW @ 48A16 ftBothBothNo1 year
Best EV charger for green energy Enel X Way JuiceBox 4811.5 kW @ 48A25 ftBothJ1772Yes3 years
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Wallbox

What are the benefits of having a Level 2 home EV charger?

Level 2 EV chargers are a major upgrade from the Level 1 device that comes with an electric car. For an in-depth explanation of charger speed, check out my guide to Level 1, 2 and DC Fast Charging

Faster than trickle charging

The main thing you need to know is that a Level 2 charger can charge an EV three to 10 times faster than a Level 1 charger can. A Level 1 charger delivers about 12 amps, give or take, and adds three to five miles of range to a typical electric car in an hour. A Level 2 charger delivers a minimum 16 amps, but most average around 40 with a rate of 15 to 30 miles of range per hour of charge, depending on the car and the specific charger.

More convenient than public charging 

If you're able to do it, charging at home is super convenient when compared with public level 2 or even DC fast charging -- no more waiting for your turn at a public station and then sitting in your car waiting to fill up. Simply plug in when you get home at the end of the day and the car should be ready to rock with a full battery in the morning. For around-town driving, I'd say it's even more convenient than going to the gas station. (Although, longer trips are a different conversation.)

Cheaper than public charging

The biggest benefit is cost. Home energy is typically cheaper per kilowatt-hour than what you'll pay at a DC fast charging station, especially if you use your EV or the charger's software to limit charging to the least expensive overnight off-peak hours. According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, the average American home pays around $0.17 per kWh, which works out to around $4.33 to drive a Tesla Model 3 100 miles. At a Supercharger, you can expect to pay up to $0.43 per kWh or around $10.75 to go the same distance.

Can improve your home's value 

Finally, installing an EV charger is a home improvement that can increase its value should you ever decide to sell. The upgrades to your home's power system are investments in your property. Adding a charger, or even just a 240-volt outlet, to your garage or driveway can make your home more appealing to buyers who drive EVs or plug-in hybrids.

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ChargePoint

How to prepare for Level 2 home charging?

There are a handful of things to think about before installing a Level 2 charger, but the first comes down to where you live and who controls your electrical supply.

Get proper permission 

If you own a home, that's probably all you need to know. You're the boss, and you can proceed with a Level 2 charging station. If you own a condo or townhome, you'll likely need permission from the homeowners' association. That could be as simple as filling out a form, or it could require jumping through a few more hoops, but you should start by reaching out to the association or property management company. If you rent a home or live in an apartment with reserved parking or a garage, hope is not lost. You'll still have to get the landlord's permission, and then determine how much power is available in the parking area and how it's metered.

Make sure you're set up for 240-volt power

If your home has an unused 240-volt circuit, you may already have most of your charger installation bases covered. An electrician may be able to confirm safe amperage and quickly get your charger wired up with minimal fuss or cost. If you have a 240-volt circuit that is being used not far from where you want to park your EV -- maybe an electric dryer in the garage -- there's a good chance you can find a Level 2 charger that will plug into the same outlet. (Most home plug-in Level 2s are available with the common NEMA 14-50 240-volt plug.) This path means you'll never be able to charge your car and run the dryer at the same time, so you may want to consider having an electrician run a second connection anyway. 

If you don't have a 240-volt current, that's not a huge challenge. The first thing you need is an electrician to tell you whether your existing electrical panel has sufficient capacity for a 240-volt line. There's a reasonable chance it does, but if it doesn't, you'll have to upgrade.

Check your home's available amperage

Next, you'll want to think about how many amps your home's 240-volt circuit can supply. For safety, the rule is that an EV charger's draw should be within 80% of the rated amperage of the circuit it's connected to. So an EVSE plugging into a 50-amp circuit shouldn't draw more than 40 amps itself. The most powerful 48-amp chargers on our Best List will require a 60-amp circuit for the fastest operation. If, like mine, your house only has room for a 30-amp circuit, then you should limit your charger to a 24-amp draw. 

Most chargers I recommend can be adjusted or limited to accommodate different circuits during installation. The Grizzl-E Classic, for example, is rated for a maximum of 10 kW at 40 amps but can be adjusted down to 3.8 kW for a 16-amp draw or 5.8 kW at 24 amps. If all of the amps and volts sound like Greek to you, seek the advice of a certified electrician who can advise you on what's safe for your home and what your options for upgrading are, if necessary.

Hardwire vs. outlet

While you're at it, you may also want to decide whether to go with a hardwired EV charger, which is semi-permanently connected to your home's electrical grid, or a plug-in charger that connects to a 240-volt electrical outlet. The former gives a cleaner install and may be able to reach higher charging rates; the latter is easier to remove and bring with you if you move but will limit you to a 40-amp output.

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megear-level-2-portable-evse-home-electric-vehicle-charging-station
Megear

How to choose a home EV charger?

Because most Level 2 chargers require high-voltage installation, picking one that meets your needs requires a bit more forethought than portable Level 1 cables. You'll need to match the connector type and high-voltage power with your EV, but also consider weatherproofing, cable length, security and the right smart home features.

Check your EV's connection type

When choosing a home EV charger, you should first check what physical connector your EV uses. If it's a Tesla, it'll use the North American Charging System (NACS) port. Most other EVs will use the catchy name SAE J1772 port… for now. Most automakers that sell electric cars in America have announced an eventual transition to NACS in the near future, but for the next few years, J1772 is here to stay. (Where plug-in hybrids fit in this NACS puzzle remains to be seen, so J1772 will likely stick with us for longer still.)

Know your EV charging speed limit

Armed with that knowledge, next you'll need to figure out at what speed your EV can charge. Your EV's hardware has a built-in charging speed limit that it won't exceed even if connected to a faster charger -- sort of like how an iPhone connected to a 65W Macbook adapter still only charges at 20W. (This also means you can't really damage your EV by plugging into a more powerful charger.) Knowing this number can help you save money. There's no need, for example, to upgrade your home's circuit to accommodate an 11 kW, 48-amp charger when the Prius Prime you plan on connecting to it tops out at 6.6 kW at 28 amps (unless you're looking to do a little futureproofing.)

Indoor or outdoor installation

You'll also want to put some thought into where you plan to install the charger. Will it be indoors in a garage or outside in your driveway or a carport? If you're installing outdoors, security features may be high on your shopping list. Physical locks can keep strangers from stealing your precious kilowatt-hours while you're away from home. Alternatively, software-powered access control can let you grant access to a family member who's pet-sitting for you. The Autel MaxiCharger, for example, can be locked and unlocked with an RFID card or via a smartphone app.

High-voltage electronics also need to be protected from the elements. Most Level 2 chargers, including those on our Best List, are rated at least NEMA 3 -- a measurement of protection from environmental elements -- which is acceptable for outdoor use in dust, rain and snow. Some chargers go further to the NEMA 4 standard, which further shields against direct water pressure from, say, a garden hose. If there's lots of rain driven by stiff winds where you live, seeking that NEMA 4 rating is a good choice. Whether your Level 2 charger is going in the garage or out, it's always smart to choose one listed by Underwriters Laboratories or Edison Testing Labs. The UL or ETL listing designates compliance with safety standards established by these nationally recognized testing labs.

Proximity to your EV

The charger's location will also determine how long a connector cable you'll need. Most of the Level 2 chargers on our Best List feature 25-foot cables, which should give the most flexibility with regards to where you park and can even stretch to charge another EV or PHEV parked in a two-bay garage. The more cable you have, the more important cable management becomes, so look for an EV charger with a hook or holster to coil and hang the cable and its charging connector, keeping them off the ground, away from the elements and out of your EV's path when parking.

Bell and whistles 

Finally, we come to the bells and the whistles. Many of the home EV chargers on this list are smart chargers that connect to your home and the internet via Wi-Fi. This data connection allows you to adjust and control the charger, schedule charging times to accommodate off-peak energy rates and monitor how much energy is used during charging and how much it's costing. The JuiceBox series even includes Amazon Alexa connectivity allowing users to make specific requests like "Alexa, tell JuiceBox to add 100 miles to my car" to begin charging. Some EV chargers even feature dual charging cables allowing two EVs to be plugged in at the same time, sharing a circuit by either splitting available power or charging one after the other.

I'm a big fan of tech -- I've been writing about it for nearly 16 years -- but you may not need most or any of this advanced functionality. Many EVs already feature onboard data connections and apps that enable charge scheduling and remote monitoring, rendering these features redundant if built into the EVSE. Sometimes, a smart EVSE is simply less reliable than a simpler model despite the additional cost and complexity. Figuring out what your car can do on its own before you splurge on a charger can save hundreds of dollars and hours of headaches.

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Enel X

How much does it cost to install a home EV charger?

The cost of a home EV charger installation can vary based on multiple factors, including the age of your home and the state of its electrical system, the energy needs of your EV and its EVSE, local permit and license fees, labor costs and more. Different surveys by different organizations put the average cost of installing a Level 2 charge station between $650 and $800. That's on top of the charger, of course. A best-case scenario installation in a new home that already has a 40-60 amp breaker ready for connection can be as low as $400. Older homes that require more work or upgrades to their power panel can range from $1,000 to $2,500 or more. 

This is the aspect of the budget where your mileage may vary the most, and most homeowners will want to consult an electrician for the most accurate estimate to safely have their charger installed. Your EV's manufacturer, the dealership that sold the car or your local utility may be able to recommend a preferred installer for your area. Many automakers are also partnered with installation service providers, like Qmerit, that act as a one-stop shop to help new EV owners with assessment and permits, cost estimates, connecting with licensed installers and finding local installation incentives to save money.

What is the fastest home EV charger?

The vast majority of Level 2 home EV chargers are designed around relatively common 40 to 60-amp, single-phase 240-volt American residential circuits and the 7- to 11-kilowatt maximum charging speed of most EVs. There are a few electric cars that can exceed this speed limit with an extra beefy charger. The Porsche Wall Charger Connect and Ford Charge Station Pro are 80-amp EVSEs that can send up to 19.2 kW to a connected EV with a fast enough onboard charger.

The $1,670 requires a Porsche Taycan that has also been upgraded with a dealer-installed $1,850 onboard charger. With both home and in-car hardware in place, charging time for a Performance Battery Plus drops from 10.5 to 5.3 hours. Eager early adopters have estimated that with labor costs to upgrade the car and add a 100-amp circuit to your home, the final bill can easily exceed $5,500, making it tough to justify for all but the deepest, most impatient pockets.

What about charging your home with your car?

One of the holy grails of home EV charging is bidirectional power, which is the ability to draw energy stored in an EV's battery back out of the charging port for use outside of the vehicle. Bidirectional charging allows an EV to, for example, power your home, keeping the lights on during a blackout. Setup for this level of integration is much more involved, requiring a specific vehicle that supports the technology, a smart home power panel that can accept power from an EV and the bidirectional charger itself, which is often significantly more expensive than a normal Level 2 charger.

The aforementioned Ford Charge Station Pro is included with the purchase of the F-150 Lightning when equipped with the Extended Range battery, but it can also be purchased separately for $1,310. The 19.2 kW charger can add up to 30 miles of range per hour connected and enables the connected full-size electric pickup to power your home during a blackout via its Intelligent Backup Power feature.

Tesla's Cybertruck also supports Powershare bidirectional power when connected with the automaker's Universal Wall Connector and its Gateway 3V power management hardware. According to the automaker, the angular utility vehicle can power a home during an outage for over three days with 11.5 kW of continuous output.

How we evaluate home EV chargers

When selecting the best EV chargers for this list, I leaned heavily on my 16 years of experience evaluating electric cars and plug-in hybrids for CNET reviews. Over the years, I've been able to learn from the EV automakers, their engineers and other industry experts about what to look for in a good home EV charger. I have also spoken extensively with certified electricians while getting charging set up for our long-term Kia EV6 test car at my home last year. Compiling that information into this guide, I've chosen what I think will be the best home EV chargers you can buy today with an eye toward the needs of the EVs of tomorrow. 

EV charger FAQs

Do I need a Level 2 charger?

Maybe. A Level 2 charger will be faster than the Level 1 AC charger that typically comes with every EV. Whether it's worth the additional cost depends on your living circumstances, your driving habits, your EV or PHEV's range and your access to public charging stations. If you want maximum convenience and don't want to have to rely on public, high-speed stations for daily driving, you probably want Level 2, which can substantially reduce the small hassles and anxiety of owning an electric car.

Which is the best home charger for electric cars?

The best EV charger for you depends on a host of circumstances: how and where you plan to use it, how soon or frequently you expect to move, whether you want to use an app to manage it and even the electric vehicle you plan to charge. This buying guide will provide more thorough guidance, but the best answer for the broadest number of people is a plug-in Level 2 charger with a peak charge rate around 40 amps.

Are all EV home chargers the same?

Home EV chargers can be divided two ways: By their charging speed and their connector types. Charging speed is split into Levels 1 and 2. Level 2 chargers are generally between six and 10 times faster than Level 1, but require 240-volt power rather than the more common 120-volt socket. For home chargers, there are two connector types: SAE J1772 or Tesla's NACS connector. 

Can you buy a Level 3 charger for home?

Technically, yes, you can buy a home Level 3 charger, but you probably wouldn't want to. There are a few 480-volt AC chargers that can accept three-phase power, but that's a very specific power requirement that calls for a dedicated commercial power line, which would be a huge, prohibitively expensive hassle for a homeowner. That's before you factor $1,500 to $2,000 for the charger itself.

Meanwhile, Autel's upcoming MaxiCharger DC V2X uses the same CCD connection as DC fast charging stations, but its output of 40 amps at 300 volts means this 12 kW station is only slightly faster than the 11.5 kW AC stations on this list. Rather, the MaxiCharger DC uses direct current to facilitate bidirectional charging, integration with solar and stationary battery storage and Green Energy Trading with the grid. Pricing, availability and compatible vehicles are all still TBD.

Antuan Goodwin Reviews Editor / Cars
Antuan Goodwin gained his automotive knowledge the old fashioned way, by turning wrenches in a driveway and picking up speeding tickets. From drivetrain tech and electrification to car audio installs and cabin tech, if it's on wheels, Antuan is knowledgeable.
Expertise Reviewing cars and car technology since 2008 focusing on electrification, driver assistance and infotainment Credentials
  • North American Car, Truck and SUV of the Year (NACTOY) Awards Juror
Antuan Goodwin
Antuan Goodwin gained his automotive knowledge the old fashioned way, by turning wrenches in a driveway and picking up speeding tickets. From drivetrain tech and electrification to car audio installs and cabin tech, if it's on wheels, Antuan is knowledgeable.

Article updated on May 11, 2024 at 5:00 AM PDT

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Antuan Goodwin Reviews Editor / Cars
Antuan Goodwin gained his automotive knowledge the old fashioned way, by turning wrenches in a driveway and picking up speeding tickets. From drivetrain tech and electrification to car audio installs and cabin tech, if it's on wheels, Antuan is knowledgeable.
Expertise Reviewing cars and car technology since 2008 focusing on electrification, driver assistance and infotainment Credentials
  • North American Car, Truck and SUV of the Year (NACTOY) Awards Juror
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