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Acura NSX will return, possibly as an EV, report says

"There's gonna be another one," an Acura executive confirmed.

2022-acura-nsx-type-s-116
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2022-acura-nsx-type-s-116

The Type S boosts the NSX's output to 600 horsepower.

Acura

The new Type S marks the end of the line for current , but it's not a final farewell for the supercar. Speaking to The Drive at Monterey Car Week earlier this month, Acura Vice President Jon Ikeda confirmed the NSX will return. Even better, there's a good chance it'll be electric.

"If you notice, we make an NSX when there's something we want to say," Ikeda told The Drive. "The first-gen was gas. Second-gen was a hybrid. There's gonna be another one."

While Ikeda did not explicitly say the next NSX will be an EV, when asked, The Drive noted he "replied with a smile and refused to comment further."

"At some point in the future, we will decide that it is time to create a vehicle that will push the limits and embodies what we can do in the extreme," Acura said in a statement. "That is a role for NSX."

As a swan song for the current supercar, Acura created the NSX Type S. Priced from $171,495 (including destination) and limited to just 350 units worldwide, the NSX Type S produces 600 horsepower, 492 pound-feet of torque and has a few other powertrain and chassis improvements. It looks pretty freaking rad, too.

The 2022 Acura NSX Type S is a proper supercar send-off

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Steven Ewing Former managing editor
Steven Ewing spent his childhood reading car magazines, making his career as an automotive journalist an absolute dream job. After getting his foot in the door at Automobile while he was still a teenager, Ewing found homes on the mastheads at Winding Road magazine, Autoblog and Motor1.com before joining the CNET team in 2018. He has also served on the World Car Awards jury. Ewing grew up ingrained in the car culture of Detroit -- the Motor City -- before eventually moving to Los Angeles. In his free time, Ewing loves to cook, binge trash TV and play the drums.
Steven Ewing
Steven Ewing spent his childhood reading car magazines, making his career as an automotive journalist an absolute dream job. After getting his foot in the door at Automobile while he was still a teenager, Ewing found homes on the mastheads at Winding Road magazine, Autoblog and Motor1.com before joining the CNET team in 2018. He has also served on the World Car Awards jury. Ewing grew up ingrained in the car culture of Detroit -- the Motor City -- before eventually moving to Los Angeles. In his free time, Ewing loves to cook, binge trash TV and play the drums.

Article updated on August 24, 2021 at 12:32 PM PDT

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Steven Ewing Former managing editor
Steven Ewing spent his childhood reading car magazines, making his career as an automotive journalist an absolute dream job. After getting his foot in the door at Automobile while he was still a teenager, Ewing found homes on the mastheads at Winding Road magazine, Autoblog and Motor1.com before joining the CNET team in 2018. He has also served on the World Car Awards jury. Ewing grew up ingrained in the car culture of Detroit -- the Motor City -- before eventually moving to Los Angeles. In his free time, Ewing loves to cook, binge trash TV and play the drums.
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