Luxury cars

2019 Audi A8 coming this fall with $83,800 price tag

For all the stuff that comes standard, that's a pretty good price.

Audi

The battle for luxo-barge supremacy continues on as Audi prepares to unleash the redesigned 2019 A8, and its price is wildly competitive for what it offers.

The 2019 Audi A8 goes on sale this fall. It will start at $83,800 before destination, which is only a few hundred bucks more than the BMW 7 Series, and about six grand less than a base Mercedes S-Class. The first engine offered will be a 3.0-liter turbocharged V6 putting out 335 horsepower and 369 pound-feet of torque. A V8 variant will go on sale next summer.

Red isn't often the first choice for a sedate luxury sedan, but it still looks good.

Audi

While that is definitely a fair chunk of change, the 2019 A8 carries a load of standard equipment. That base price includes 18-way power front seats, a leather interior and adaptive air suspension. Every A8 is also mildly electrified, thanks to a new 48-volt mild hybrid system that offers extended stop-start capability and regenerative braking.

If you're looking for cabin tech, there's a whole crapload of it. A 12.3-inch 720p gauge screen is standard, as is the latest version of Audi's MMI infotainment system with two screens -- a 10.3-inch upper screen offers quick views at maps and audio, while the 8.6-inch lower screen handles climate control, seating and other various shortcuts. You can trick out the interior further with an optional head-up display and a 23-speaker Bang & Olufsen sound system.

Audi also boosted the A8's driver-assist systems, thanks in part to the first use of lidar in a production vehicle. An optional driver assistance package provides autobrake capability at intersections, a system that'll prevent your door from opening if it would come in contact with a bicyclist and a system that can raise the vehicle when it detects an impending side collision.

It also packs something called Adaptive Cruise Assist, which is a semi-autonomous system that'll hold the vehicle in its lane and follow along with traffic at both low and high speeds. It's a driver-assist system that falls closer to the Level 2 definition of semi-autonomy, as it requires hands-on engagement at all times. If you're looking for Audi's Level 3 system that was touted at launch, you're out of luck -- that won't be coming to the US.