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SteelSeries Kinzu v2 review: SteelSeries Kinzu v2

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SteelSeries' Kinzu v2, is unsurprisingly similar to its forebear, a mouse that we found decent, but too expensive for what it offered.

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8.0

SteelSeries Kinzu v2

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The Good

Light and simple. A new price befitting its entry-level nature.

The Bad

SteelSeries Engine needs a polish.

The Bottom Line

Like the classic Microsoft Intellimouse, if you're on a budget the Kinzu v2 is a great choice.

The v2 comes along with an upgraded sensor and microcontroller, ostensibly for better performance — but it also comes with a significantly more appealing price tag of AU$49.

It's still as basic on the outside as it ever was: left- and right-click buttons, a scroll wheel, and a single button under the scroll wheel to switch CPI, which is what SteelSeries says is the correct way to refer to DPI. We have sympathy for the claim: counts per inch make a hell of a lot more sense than dots per inch when you're talking screens.

SteelSeries' "Engine" is now the default control panel, and can be hard on the eyes as a large amount of the text, and even SteelSeries' logo, is blurry. Despite SteelSeries' macro editor being included here, we'd suggest you stay away — there are no non-critical buttons on the mouse to assign a macro to. Since the Kinzu is a simple mouse the options are limited: you can set the two CPI levels for the switcher under the scroll wheel to either 400, 800, 1600 or 3200 CPI, adjust the OS's USB polling rate, and that's pretty much it.

A quick jaunt through Serious Sam: HD proved the Kinzu to still hold the SteelSeries DNA, meaning great performance and accuracy. Like the classic Microsoft Intellimouse, if you're on a budget the Kinzu is a great choice.