Origin PC Omni review: An overstuffed all-in-one for closet gamers

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Or maybe it's the mullet: all business up front and a not-so-pretty party on the bottom. The only aspect I really like with respect to the layout is the USB port on the top. It's intended for the snap-in webcam, but it's the most easily reachable port, and on top is a great place to connect a calibrator.

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The most easily accessible connectors are in a cluster on the back right; a USB 3.0, USB 2.0, microphone and headphone back. Plus there's an SD card slot.

Lori Grunin/CNET

About a third of the back is vented, with a cluster of connectors conveniently located on the back right. Underneath the display? Oy. That's where the motherboard and graphics card's connectors come out. While it's crammed with useful ones (for an all-in-one), they're kind of hard to get to -- and I'm talking about frequently used ones, like USB -- without laying down the system. One cable runs outside from the back of the graphics card to the display. Ours came with an HDMI connection but I also tried it with a Mini DisplayPort-to-full-size DP cable. It worked fine but plugging in the Mini DP cable was like threading a needle. It also means that the two antenna connectors (for extending the range of the Wi-Fi and Bluetooth) are in an odd place. (Look at the photos for a more detailed discussion about the available connectors and layout.)

The big display is like pretty much every other 34-inch, 3,440x1,440-pixel curved monitor I've seen lately, with a decent 100-percent sRGB gamut that looks very good for games, as long as you're looking at it dead on without tilt. The size is great for playing with a wider field of view. The matte display is great from a reflectivity perspective, but it suffers from color and contrast shifts when viewing from even a little off-angle.

Fast. But.

The system performs as fast as you'd expect given its components, and it was only occasionally outpaced by others we've tested that incorporate the Intel Extreme CPUs with more cores. I've got few complaints about the gameplay.

You'd think that a system so upgradable and beyond-VR-ready would have futureproofness baked right in. But the problem with an all-in-one is that you're stuck with the display and its low refresh rate. While it's big, it's also the first generation of the 34-inch panels we've seen, so better ones are hopefully in the offing. It does't support G-Sync, which, given the Nvidia firepower inside, makes me a little sad.

You can add a second display if you want, but I'm not sure where you'd put it given the size of the built-in monitor. If you put it to the side and added another 34-inch next to it for a semicircle, it would be awesomely immersive, but the visual sweet spots would be on your sides and the bezels would be in front of your face.

Origin offers "pro" custom build with Xeon and Quadro options as well, but power isn't an issue here. This curved display just isn't suitable for a lot of the types of graphics-intensive tasks performed on a workstation because of the distortion of straight lines, flaws in visual color uniformity, relatively small gamut and/or possibly the odd 21:9 aspect ratio.

Needs some polish

There's so much I like about the concept, but the execution needs some work before I can get behind it. For one, it needs a better-designed chassis. Origin's done the best it could with an off-the-shelf model, but it feels just a little too kludgy. That's fine when you're putting together a desktop that you want to look geeked out and to tinker with, but that's not what the Omni is.

I think a lower-end configuration makes more sense if you do like the idea; spend about $1,500 less and you can still put together a pretty powerful all-in-one, but that works within the limitations.

Multimedia Multitasking test 3.0

Origin PC Omni (2017)
114
Falcon Northwest Tiki (2016)
120
MSI GT83VR
145
Microsoft Surface Studio
171
Dell XPS 27 (2016)
196

Note:

Shorter bars indicate better performance (in seconds)

Geekbench 3 (Multi-Core)

Falcon Northwest Tiki (2016)
24461
Origin PC Omni (2017)
19979
MSI GT83VR
14604
Microsoft Surface Studio
13648
Dell XPS 27 (2016)
13204

Note:

Longer bars indicate better performance

3DMark Fire Strike Ultra

MSI GT83VR
8594
Origin PC Omni (2017)
7191
Falcon Northwest Tiki (2016)
4421
Microsoft Surface Studio
2341
Dell XPS 27 (2016)
1019

Note:

Longer bars indicate better performance

Bioshock Infinite gaming test

Origin PC Omni (2017)
283
MSI GT83VR
270
Falcon Northwest Tiki (2016)
201.87
Microsoft Surface Studio
117.67
Dell XPS 27 (2016)
77.5

Note:

Longer bars indicate better performance (FPS)

System Configurations

Origin PC Omni (2017) Microsoft Windows 10 Home (64-bit); 4.2GHz Intel Core i7-7700K; 16GB DDR4 SDRAM; 12GB Nvidia GeForce GTX Titain X; 500GB SSD + 2TB HDD
Dell XPS 27 (2016) Microsoft Windows 10 Home (64-bit); 3.4GHz Intel Core i7-6700; 16GB DDR4 SDRAM 2400MHz; 4GB AMD Radeon R9 M470X; 512GB SSD
Falcon Northwest Tiki (2016) Microsoft Windows 10 Pro (64-bit); 3GHz Intel Core i7-5960X; 16GB DDR4 SDRAM 2,133MHZ; 8GB Nvida GeForce GTX 980Ti; 512GB SSD + 6TB HDD 5700rpm
Microsoft Surface Studio Microsoft Windows 10 Pro (64-bit); 2.7GHz Intel Core i7-6820HQ, 32GB DDR4 SDRAM 2,133MHz, 4GB Nvidia GeForce GTX 980M; 2TB HDD + 128GB SSD
MSI GT83VR Microsoft Windows 10 Home (64-bit); 2.9GHz Intel Core i7-6920; 32GB DDR4 SDRAM 2,400MHz; (2) 8GB Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080; (2) 512GB SSD RAID 0 + 1TB HDD