CNET también está disponible en español.

Ir a español

Don't show this again

Netgear R6300 review: Netgear R6300

You can also manage guest access, and there's a network map, too. The latter looks cool, and it does let you know who's connected -- but you can't do anything useful with it, like throttle individual devices or simply kick them off the network altogether.

Parental controls only work if the router is online, and need you to sign up to the OpenDNS service to manage them. There was also another option called "Access Control", but all it ever did on our Android phone was show a loading screen; it never managed to open the section. It's clear that Netgear has some work to do here.

Performance

After analysing the spectrum with InSSIDer, an empty channel of either 1, 6 or 11 is chosen for 2.4GHz wireless testing. Usually, the router is restricted to the 20MHz band if the option is available.

We use iperf to determine throughput, running eight streams with a TCP window size of 1MB and an interval of one second. The test is run for five minutes in three different locations on two separate occasions. The locations are in the same room as the router: one floor down around spiral stairs and with concrete walls and floors, and two floors down under the same conditions.

The wireless throughput is tested using three chipsets (the Atheros AR5008X, Ralink RT2870 and Intel Ultimate-N 6300), and then all results are averaged.

2.4GHz throughput (in Mbps)

  • Cisco Linksys EA4500
  • AVM Fritz!Box 7390
  • Netgear WNDR4500
  • Netgear R6300
  • 139.00136.33111.1599.70
    Location one (same room, no obstructions)
  • 131.0090.8067.6364.63
    Location two (one floor down, some obstructions)
  • 53.8353.1644.3037.17
    Location three (two floors down, some obstructions)

(Longer bars indicate better performance)

The R6300 pulls impressive scores in our second test location, outstripping the competition. It's still competitive in our other test locations, too.

5GHz throughput (in Mbps)

  • Cisco Linksys EA4500
  • AVM Fritz!Box 7390
  • Netgear WNDR4500
  • Netgear R6300
  • Netgear R6300 802.11ac (Bridged)
  • 537205.33189.67171140.67
    Location one (same room, no obstructions)
  • 507151.33135.50132.3392.6
    Location two (one floor down, some obstructions)
  • 1398.538.533.700
    Location three (two floors down, some obstructions)

(Longer bars indicate better performance)

Here, some explanation is warranted. The bridged entry shows 802.11ac performance when bridged to another Netgear R6300 router, which is then connected via Ethernet to a laptop. The results are an extremely promising indication of what 802.11ac performance will be like compared to current 802.11n 5GHz. What's even more interesting is the range; our third location is particularly difficult for 802.11n 5GHz, with most laptop adapters failing to see the SSID or not connecting. The bridged routers not only blow away the 5GHz score, but the 2.4GHz as well.

This, of course, comes with caveats: the whole point of being wireless is, well, being wireless, and bridging a router and connecting over Ethernet isn't that, nor is it pragmatic. It's not going to make your current gear faster, either; you'll need an 802.11ac adapter in your laptop, phone or tablet to take advantage of this new speed. It comes with two issues: they don't exist yet, and they'll likely be significantly slower than this bridged connection. Still, the potential for wireless HD, high-bitrate video streaming over decent distances is there.

In standard 802.11n 5GHz, the R6300 also manages to perform reasonably well.

Warranty

Netgear covers the R6300 with a two-year warranty.

Conclusion

The R6300 is quite a beast of a router, and it certainly gives a promise of things to come. While we score it highly, we'd hold off on purchasing anything 802.11ac until client chips are more widespread -- by then, there'll likely be something even better around.

Best Wireless Routers for 2019

All Best Networking

More Best Products

All Best Products