Frigidaire Gallery 30-Inch Electric Range review: Consistently cooks in style but at a premium price

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Who says you can't make nice omelets on an electric stove? Tyler Lizenby/CNET

Performance

As it turns out, this well-appointed appliance demonstrated real culinary chops during CNET Appliance Labs testing. Using its small burner, the machine turned in an average boil time of just over 12 minutes (12 minutes, 14 seconds) which is fast for an electric. Boiling water on one of the Gallery's large burners took almost the same time, an average of 13 minutes and 13 seconds. The range's quick-boil burner lived up to its name too, bringing a 112-ounce pot of water to boil in under 12 minutes (11 minute 55 seconds on average).

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We roasted chickens properly but their skin wasn't very crispy. Tyler Lizenby/CNET

And despite the lack of a true convection oven, the Frigidaire Gallery managed to keep its oven temperatures very consistent. So whether you're roasting chickens, biscuits, vegetables, or pizza, the machine should deliver very repeatable results. Of course no standard oven can really offer the same level of evenness as a convection oven, and this Frigidaire is no exception. On our multi-rack bake tests we still saw a significant difference in the brownness of biscuits, with the top rack biscuits coming out much darker than those on the lower rack.

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Biscuits baked on the bottom rack (right) were underdone compared with the top rack (left). Tyler Lizenby/CNET

Broiling with the Gallery 30-Inch is pretty straight forward and I had no trouble whipping up plates of tasty test burgers. I did notice that the appliance did have a tendency to crisp the tops of my hamburger patties a bit too much, at least compared with other ovens including a Whirlpool WFE320M0AS Electric Range. Indeed while the Whirlpool took its time to cook its burgers (about 24 minutes), the results were more juicy. Conversely the Gallery handled the same task in an average of 18 minutes, 11 seconds but the end result was typically on the dry side.

Another annoying issue with the Gallery is that it took noticeably longer to preheat its oven to the desired temperature. My anecdotal test of preheating the appliance to 450 degrees (F) required a full 14 minutes. By comparison, my Whirlpool 30-inch electric oven completed the same task in just under 12 minutes. And what makes the wait feel longer still is the Gallery's lack of a readout for current oven temperature.

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Burgers broiled fast but ended up a tad dry. Tyler Lizenby/CNET

I do like how easy it was to clean the Frigidaire Gallery 30-Inch Electric cooktop. Its smooth, flat surface remained unmarred and unsoiled (at least permanently) throughout my entire test-cooking process. This included making numerous anecdotal omelettes, soups, bowls of ramen, and the usual spills and thrills entailed.

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The Frigidaire successfully roasted butternut squash as well. Tyler Lizenby/CNET

Conclusion

At face value the $899 Frigidaire Gallery 30-Inch Electric Range is an enticing proposition. It comes cloaked in attractive stainless steel, it offers excellent cooktop performance and very stable oven temperatures for a mid-range electric oven. The Gallery's controls, while not front-panel mounted, are simple enough to use, at least compared to touchscreen challengers such as the $800 LG LRE3021 .

Priced at $100 less, however, the $800 GE JB650SFSS is the smarter option since it matches the Frigidaire Gallery's stainless steel style, number of burners. If you really have your heart set on owning a convection device though you'll have to spend a little extra, to the tune of $100. GE trumps Frigidaire here too with the step-up convection model coming in at $900.