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DrayTek Vigor2820n ADSL2+ Router review: DrayTek Vigor2820n ADSL2+ Router

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The Good Offers a gigabit Ethernet port. Easy set-up and excellent configuration options. Content filter. Load balancing and redundancy support. USB printer port.

The Bad Relatively expensive — make sure you need all the features!. USB adaptor performance gains apply only at close range.

The Bottom Line DrayTek's Vigor2820n offers a vast array of features, but you'll pay for them. Make sure you need everything it offers first!

8.0 Overall

Review Sections

Design and Features
The Vigor2820n from DrayTek is an attractively styled wireless modem router, the waved surface not only looks good, but it also deters people from inappropriately placing other devices on top of it. The 2820 series also includes models which are VoIP and ISDN capable, although with Telstra soon to be shutting down ISDN, the former is definitely more useful than the latter.

The router comes with a USB adaptor for laptops which don't have built-in wireless support, while a USB port on the router itself allows a printer to be plugged in and shared across your network. Device configuration was straightforward, relying on a browser-based interface with a clear menu structure which is always visible. There are, however, many features to explore, so you may wish to browse the manual before starting.

Apart from the usual range of security features expected in a router, the Vigor includes a simple content filter that supports blocking by keywords, file type, time and IP range. A more advanced Web filter with 40 categories is available by subscription (a trial subscription comes with the device). Also included are denial-of-service defences and an additional WAN port to support load-balancing and network redundancy where network reliability is critical.

Performance
Our performance testing on wireless routers consists of checking wireless throughput speeds over a variety of distances between a notebook and the router. To test the router it is located at one end of a 55-metre long hallway, while the connection to the notebook is tested at five-metre increments by transferring a 1MB file between it and a wired PC, using the application Qcheck.

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