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D-Link RangeBooster N 650 ADSL2+ Router (DSL-2740B) review: D-Link RangeBooster N 650 ADSL2+ Router (DSL-2740B)

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The Good Great range of management features. Excellent warranty period. Port filtering and modest URL filtering.

The Bad Performance was a little erratic. Status lights are separated from corresponding ports. 10Mbps Ethernet only.

The Bottom Line The DSL-2740B is a modem and router that offers a good balance between price and features, with a slightly shaky performance.

Visit manufacturer site for details.

7.0 Overall

Review Sections

Design
Housed in a contemporary black and silver case, D-Link's RangeBooster N 650 DSL-2740B modem router sports three aerials to maximise wireless performance. Theoretically the more aerials, the more the workload can be shared for broader coverage, stronger signal and higher througput.

It's great to see D-Link has the common sense to print default IP and log-in details on the bottom of the device to make setting up a little easier — although for security purposes you may want to change these during initial set-up.

Features
While the DSL-2740B is bristling with aerials, what is lacking is a USB port for networked printing. If you want to share a printer across the network, this means you'll either have to share it through your PC, purchase a printer that has a print server and hence Ethernet port built in, or go for another router.

The router, however, does pack in all the features expected on the network management side, including port and IP forwarding, scheduled firewall and Web content filtering (managed via a black/white list), QOS control and WEP/WPA security.

Performance
Our performance testing on wireless routers consists of checking wireless throughput speeds over a variety of distances between a notebook and the router. To test the router it is located at one end of a 55-metre long hallway, while the connection to the notebook is tested at five-metre increments by transferring a 1MB file between it and a wired PC, using the application Qcheck.

This is done until either the 55-metre point is hit, or the notebook is unable to reliably connect. At the 25-metre point there is a "dog-leg" in the hallway, and two results are recorded here — the first one is in line-of-sight, the second and all subsequent points after are obstructed.

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