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Cygnett GrooveZone headphones review: Cygnett GrooveZone headphones

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The Good Snug earcans reduce some ambient noise. Full-bodied bass. Inexpensive. Comes with a heap of accessories.

The Bad Ears get warm after about half an hour. Construction feels cheap and flimsy.

The Bottom Line The construction is a little flimsy, but the GrooveZones deliver solid audio. The mountain of included accessories is a nice bonus.

Visit manufacturer site for details.

7.5 Overall

Review Sections

Before we get started on the finer points of Cygnett's GrooveZones, a nitpicky technical distinction must be made. The company's info on its GrooveZone headphones states that "the GrooveZone's over-ear design cancels out the buzz of everyday life". Skimming through this statement, some might drop everything and rush to their local retailer, salivating at the notion of picking up noise-cancelling earcan headphones for AU$69.95.

Attention shoppers -- the GrooveZones are not noise-cancelling in the active, pricey, Bose QuietComfort way, but noise-isolating. This means that the sounds from the surrounding world are reduced by creating a physical barrier, rather than via circuitry and signal inversion.

With that clarification sorted, let's move on to the all-important looks.

Design
The GrooveZones are available in white and black, but if you're planning to choose white to match an iPod, prepare to do some polishing -- ours got grubby within a week. The moulded earcans exhibit cutie-pie contours last seen in JBL's Reference 420 headphones and are finished in gleaming plastic. Unlike the 420s, they swivel for folding into the supplied case. The plastic connecting either earcan to the headband feels hollow and flimsy, but the leather-coated headband itself is comfy against the head.

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