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Crazy Pig review: Crazy Pig

Crazy Pig might initially appeal to Nintendogs fans who wanted more bacon and fewer fleas, but its limitations soon become very clear.

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Alex Kidman , Zoe Kidman
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Alex Kidman

Alex Kidman is a freelance word writing machine masquerading as a person, a disguise he's managed for over fifteen years now, including a three year stint at ZDNet/CNET Australia. He likes cats, retro gaming and terrible puns.

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Zoe Kidman

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Nintendogs has a lot to answer for, and Crazy Pig shows why. On the surface, it basically is Nintendogs, but with a bacon-based protagonist instead. We split our playing time between a grizzled veteran gamer (34), and a gamer more in the target market for this type of game, a six year old girl.

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5.1

Crazy Pig

The Good

Cute animation. Easy to learn.

The Bad

Very limited gameplay. Only two save slots. Terrible ingame music.

The Bottom Line

Crazy Pig might initially appeal to Nintendogs fans who wanted more bacon and fewer fleas, but its limitations soon become very clear.

What became quickly apparent wasn't really how good Crazy Pig was - it's a very limited Pig simulator with annoyingly repetitive music (and this both players agreed on) with a collection of fairly short and repetitive minigames. It also doesn't help that the pig-rearing part of the game is quite limited; you can only scratch, clean or feed your pig and watch the mostly pre-rendered animations so many times before it becomes dull for players of any age.

Crazy Pig isn't a terrible title given the asking price, but it is limited, and those after a game to entertain their kids for a long time will do better elsewhere.