Sony Handycam DCR-HC36

The Good Very compact size; lightweight; easy to use; low price.

The Bad Mediocre video quality; short battery life; no accessory shoe; low-quality stills.

The Bottom Line Unless this camcorder's low-resolution, low-quality stills are important to you, you might as well go for Sony's less expensive DCR-HC26.

Editors' Rating
  • Design 7.0
  • Features 6.0
  • Performance 6.0
  • Image quality 4.0
6.0 Overall

Compare

Sony Handycam DCR-HC36
Sony Handycam DCR-HC36
GoPro Hero5 Black
GoPro Hero5 Black
GoPro Hero 6 Black
GoPro Hero6 Black
GoPro Hero
GoPro Hero
GoPro Hero3+ (Black Edition)
GoPro Hero3+ Black Edition
Price $480 MSRP $299 Amazon.com $399 Amazon.com $125 Amazon Marketplace $380 Amazon.com
Design
7
9
9
7
7
Features
6
9
9
6
9
Performance
6
8
9
8
8
Image quality
4
8
8
7
9

Review

Sony Handycam DCR-HC36

main content

The differences between Sony's entry-level MiniDV camcorders, the Handycam DCR-HC26 and the DCR-HC36, don't add up to much. The biggest is the HC36's Memory Stick Duo Pro slot for still-image recording. But, since the camera's 1/6-inch CCD outputs stills at a resolution of 340,000 pixels, you shouldn't expect to get decent prints from it. So, unless you really enjoy e-mailing drab, low-res images to your friends, that feature won't help you much. The other main difference is the HC36's remote control, which might come in handy when watching your tapes, but probably isn't worth the difference in price.

On the plus side, the Sony Handycam DCR-HC36 is small and lightweight, making it easy to throw in a bag or shoot with for extended periods of time. Plus, the top-loading tape compartment makes switching tapes easier if you're using a tripod. The basic controls are all in the right place, with the record button exactly where your thumb falls naturally, and the same applies to the side-to-side zoom rocker. Three buttons on the camera's left side control the amount of info that appears on the display and let you enter backlight or Easy mode. Everything else--including menu access--happens through the 2.5-inch touch-screen LCD. While the touch-screen interface is well designed and the menus are intuitive, the LCD felt too small for the task, as is often the case with Sony camcorders. Joystick controls, such as those found on some newer Canon camcorders are more comfortable to use, but Sony's touch screen is still much better than the hidden buttons found on Hitachi's DVD camcorders.

If you venture outside of the fully automatic Easy mode, Sony offers a fair amount of manual control. In addition to a handful of program autoexposure presets, such as Landscape and Portrait, you can also opt for full manual exposure. Of course, both auto and manual focus are also available, though setting critical focus manually via the LCD screen was not easy. Not only was the screen too small to tell if finer details were actually in focus, but we had a hard time getting the focus to land in the right place with the touch-screen controls. We were much more pleased with the camcorder's NightShot plus mode, which uses an infrared assist lamp to create monotone, greenish video, even in total darkness, that's much more pleasing than the extremely grainy and/or blurry footage you get from most camcorders.

Continue Reading

Specs / Prices

  • MSRP $480
  • Brand Sony
  • Type camcorder
  • Weight 0.88 lbs
  • Optical Sensor Type Advanced HAD CCD
See full specs

Report errors

Latest News