Nikon D60

The Good Optically stabilized kit lens; convenient onscreen user interface; compatible with a wide variety of lenses and accessories.

The Bad Pricey for what it offers; lens-based image stabilization is less flexible than sensor-shift offered by some competitors.

The Bottom Line Despite modest improvements in performance and a couple of new features, Nikon's D60 fails to impress and costs more than some competing models.

Editors' Rating
  • Design 8.0
  • Features 7.0
  • Performance 7.0
  • Image quality 7.0
7.2 Overall

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Nikon D60 (Body Only)
Nikon D60
Nikon D3400 (with AF-P 18-55mm VR lens, black)
Nikon D3400
Canon EOS Rebel T6 (with 18-55mm lens)
Canon EOS Rebel T6/EOS 1300D
Canon EOS Rebel T7i (with 18-135 STM lens)
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Nikon D5600 (with 18-140mm VR lens)
Nikon D5600
Price $630 MSRP $497 Amazon.com $399 Beach Camera $1,049 42nd Street Photo $879 42nd Street Photo
Design
8
7
7
8
8
Features
7
7
6
8
8
Performance
7
8
7
8
8
Image quality
7
8
7
7
8

Review

Nikon D60

Editor's note: Upon further analysis and comparison with competitive models that we didn't have at the time of this review, we have lowered the D60's image quality score from an 8 to a 7 to better place it among the field of entry level dSLRs. This lowered the camera's overall rating to a 7.2

There was a time when the idea of an entry-level dSLR was a bit of an oxymoron. Even the least expensive SLR was a large step up from the digital compacts at the time, but these days entry-level SLRs are being made to be entry level, and their prices line up closely with the most expensive compact cameras. Nikon's D60 is a good example of the current breed of these dSLRs. It checks in with a healthy 10.2-megapixel CCD sensor, a slightly small-by-comparison 2.5-inch LCD, and an upgraded, optically stabilized kit lens. While those features are nice, the D60 falls behind the competition in several areas in terms of its specifications. For instance, Sony's DSLR-A200 also sports 10.2-megapixels, but has a slightly larger 2.7-inch screen, body-based image stabilization, similar in-camera editing and dynamic-range optimization features, and costs less than this Nikon. Its performance numbers were slightly worse than the D60, but not by very much. Meanwhile Canon's Rebel XSi, which we haven't reviewed as of this writing, offers 12.2-megapixels, a 3-inch LCD, 14-bit digital-to-analog conversion, and also comes with an optically stabilized lens, though its list price is higher than the D60. The main issue with this Nikon is that it doesn't feel like a major upgrade over the D40x, while Sony's and Canon's upgrades over their predecessors are easy for consumers to understand, such as the Rebel's shift from 10.1MP to 12.2MP.

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Specs / Prices

  • MSRP $630
  • Brand Nikon Inc.
  • Digital Camera Type Entry-level dSLR
  • Sensor Resolution 10.2 pixels
  • Optical Sensor Size (metric) 15.8 x 23.6 mm
  • Optical Sensor Type CCD
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