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Dell Latitude 7390 2-in-1 review: A stealthy 2-in-1 that keeps prying eyes out

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Dell Latitude 7390 2-in-1

(Part #: cto47390132n1us)
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The Good The Dell Latitude 7390 2-in-1 puts a lot data protection features into an unassuming pen-enabled convertible design that's available in a variety of configurations to meet your work and budget needs. Battery life is excellent at more than 10 hours and it can be powered with an external battery pack via its Thunderbolt 3 port.

The Bad Data protection hardware along with Dell's software and services quickly ratchet the price up. It seems slightly heavy for its size and its keyboard is on the small side.

The Bottom Line If your primary concern is keeping your data private at all costs while you're in the office or on the road, the Dell Latitude 7390 2-in-1 has you covered.

8.0 Overall
  • Design 8.0
  • Features 8.0
  • Performance 8.0
  • Battery 8.0

Dell's 13.3-inch Latitude 7390 2-in-1 ($1,849 at Dell, Inc.) combines all the stuff we liked about its consumer counterpart, the XPS 13 2-in-1, with fresh components along with the privacy and data protection options business users need -- all in a simple, small black body. 

Pricing starts at $1,149 for a barebones configuration, but it can easily break the $2,000 mark with all that Dell offers for it. For example, the one reviewed here came to $2,108 and there were still hardware and software options left to tack on. In the UK, the price starts at £1,359 with a similar configuration to ours running £1,899. Australian pricing starts AU$3,923, but will cost you $4,763 for the one reviewed here

Like the XPS 13 2-in-1, you can get the Latitude 7390 with both an IR camera for facial recognition and a fingerprint reader for Windows Hello sign-ins. But, since this is aimed at business users who might need even greater system protection, the 7390 also has a Smart Card reader in the side as well as a contactless NFC Smart Card reader in the body. On top of that, Dell has a bunch of optional threat protection services for malware, viruses, spyware and ransomware as well as options for backup and encryption.   

The 7390 is built tougher than Dell's consumer laptops, too, so you don't have to worry as much about it getting banged around. And if you spend more time in coffee shops and airports than an office, you can pop in a micro-SIM card for an always-on mobile broadband connection and stay off public Wi-Fi hotspots. Basically, the Latitude 7390 might borrow its design from the XPS 13 2-in-1, but the rest is a premium business PC. 

08-dell-latitude-7390-2-in-1

Dressed in black, the Latitude 7390 2-in-1 is not office casual. 

Sarah Tew/CNET

Dell Latitude 7390 2-in-1

Price as reviewed $2,108
Display size/resolution 13.3-inch, 1,920 x 1,080 touch display
PC CPU 1.9GHz Intel Core i7-8650U
PC Memory 16GB DDR3 SDRAM 2,133MHz
Graphics 128MB dedicated Intel UHD Graphics 620
Storage 512GB PCIe NVMe SSD
Networking 802.11ac Wi-Fi; Bluetooth 4.2
Operating system Windows 10 Pro (64-bit)

Protection and productivity

Setting all the hardware, software and services Dell offers to keep the 7390 private and secure aside, it's a generally excellent two-in-one. It's all black and covered in a soft-touch texture that adds some grip for carrying around the office, but picks up fingerprints nearly as much as a glossy plastic would. At 3.1 pounds (1.4 kg), the system feels weighty for its small frame, though it does give it an air of sturdiness and reliability you really want in a business laptop.

Dell does make these to survive minor drops, vibration, humidity and dust, but if you're concerned about staying up and running, you can get its ProSupport Plus service -- for an additional cost, of course -- that covers you for accidental damage in addition to other support services. 

The extra heft does make it a bit heavy to use as a tablet and, unlike Lenovo's X1 Yoga, the keyboard doesn't retract into the body. With the configuration I tested, Dell includes an active pen for drawing and writing on the screen. It can't be stored in the chassis, but there are magnets on the left side to secure it well enough. 

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