D-Link DNS-323 2-Bay Network Storage Enclosure

The Good Compact design; very easy to set up; intuitive Web interface; fast write speed; print-serving capability; two drive bays with RAID support; can operate as a UPnP AV, iTunes, and FTP server; can also act as DHCP server; USB port for sharing a printer.

The Bad Drive bays' cover comes off too easily; doesn't support hard drives in FAT32 or NTFS format; drive bays only hold drives of regular thickness.

The Bottom Line The D-Link DNS-323 2-Bay Network Storage Enclosure is a comprehensive solution to extend your network storage and functionality. It offers great performance and, despite its long list of features, remains very easy to use.

Editors' Rating
  • Setup 8.0
  • Features 7.0
  • Performance 7.0
  • Support 7.0
7.1 Overall

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D-Link DNS-323 2-Bay Network Storage Enclosure
D-Link DNS-323 2-Bay Network Storage Enclosure
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Setup
8
10
8
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Features
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5
9
8
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Performance
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7
8
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Support
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9
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8
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Review

D-Link DNS-323 2-Bay Network Storage Enclosure

The $200 D-Link DNS-323 2-Bay Network Storage Enclosure offers a quick, yet comprehensive solution for network storage. We really liked the device for its flexibility and useful features, and at the same time wished it supported FAT32 or NTFS hard drives like the Iomega StorCenter Pro. The device can house two 3.5-inch SATA hard drives of any capacity in RAID configurations. It can also be used as an FTP, a DHCP, a UPnP AV, or an iTunes server with an excellent, intuitive Web interface. The DNS-323 comes up big where it matters most: throughput performance. Despite its few flaws and rather bulky power supply, we can easily recommend it to people who are looking for a fast, reliable way to extend their network's storage and functionalities. If you are looking for a simple NAS solution that already comes with a hard drive, however, the Iomega StorCenter might save you some start-up time and money.

Setup and design
The D-Link-DNS-323 boasts a simple, compact design with all the ports (Gigabit Ethernet, USB, and power) on the back. On the front is the hard-drive bay cover that has the power button and three blue activity status LEDs, one for each hard drive and one for the network port.

The DNS-323 doesn't come with hard drives--leaving you the option to choose what storage capacity to add. It's very easy to open the device to access its hard drive bays. We found it a bit too easy, in fact. More than once we accidentally opened the cover just by holding the device from the front to lift it up. It would be a lot better if the DNS-323's face lid had some sort of lock to prevent this. Fortunately, NAS devices are generally not supposed to be portable, and the act of opening the cover doesn't interfere with the D-Link's working status. The device can take two 3.5-inch SATA hard drives, preferably of regular thickness: all you have to do is to slide the drives in and they fit in very well. Thinner drives don't fit as snugly. There's a release latch for each drive at the back of the device, in case you want to replace the hard drives. You can use just one drive with the DNS-323, but if you want to take advantage of the RAID configuration, the second one is a must.

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Specs / Prices

  • MSRP $230
  • Brand D-Link
  • Compatibility PC
  • Type standard
  • Data Link Protocol Ethernet, Fast Ethernet, Gigabit Ethernet
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