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Canon PowerShot SD40 review:

Canon PowerShot SD40

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The Good Small and stylish; comes with dock and remote.

The Bad Terrible image noise; remote control is almost superfluous.

The Bottom Line Its small size makes it an attractive pocket camera, but its speed and image quality issues are too great to ignore.

CNET Editors' Rating

6.6 Overall

Change isn't always big. New versions of products aren't always massive, sweeping upgrades to their predecessors. A system pack, a bug fix, or a single handy new feature might be all a product gets. It might not be revolutionary, but at least it's an improvement.

That's the case with the Canon PowerShot SD40. Canon took its supersmall PowerShot SD30, dropped in a 7-megapixel sensor and new image processor, threw in a few handy accessories, and called it a day.

The camera is small and stylish, using the same body as its predecessor, the SD30. Its candy bar-size form is all metal and comes in a variety of oddly named colors, such as Olive Grey and Precious Rose. At less than an inch thick and weighing only 4.3 ounces, the SD40 fits easily into almost any pocket.

Alas, small size means small features in the SD40's case. The viewfinderless camera has only a 1.8-inch LCD, and it uses a relatively narrow angle of view for the 38mm-to-90mm-equivalent lens, the same as the SD30. Beyond the higher resolution, the SD40's most notable improvement over the SD30 is its new Digic III image processor. Canon claims the Digic III processor increases image quality, performance, and battery life, but we didn't notice any significant improvement over the SD30. If anything, performance was a bit sluggish, though that might be simply because of the camera's higher resolution. The SD40's sensor can also bump up its sensitivity to ISO 1,600, a fair improvement over the SD30's ISO 400 ceiling. Finally, the camera features SDHD support, allowing the use of 4GB and larger SD memory cards.

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