Apple MacBook Air (13-inch, April 2014)

The Good While minor, the small upgrade to the stock CPU in Apple's 13-inch MacBook Air results in improved performance. The multitouch trackpad is still the industry's best, and even better, the 13-inch Air now starts at $999, which is $100 less than the previous model.

The Bad Newer features such as touchscreens and higher-resolution displays are still missing. The ultrabook competition is catching up, in terms of design.

The Bottom Line If you own a MacBook Air from the past couple of years there's really no need to upgrade, but a small spec bump and minor price cut make the most-current Air even more attractive.

Editors' Rating
  • Design 8.0
  • Features 7.0
  • Performance 8.0
  • Battery 10.0
8.2 Overall

Compare

Apple MacBook Air (13-inch, 128GB)
Apple MacBook Air (13-inch, April 2014)
Apple MacBook (12-inch, space gray, 2017)
Apple MacBook (2017)
Apple MacBook (12-inch, Core i5, space gray, 2017)
Apple MacBook (2017)
Apple MacBook (12-inch, Core i5, silver, 2017)
Apple MacBook (2017)
Apple MacBook Air (13-inch, 256GB, 2017)
Apple MacBook Air (2017)
Price $600 Amazon.com $1,249 Amazon.com $1,539 Amazon.com $1,549 Amazon.com $999 Amazon.com
Design
8
9
9
9
7
Features
7
7
7
7
7
Performance
8
8
8
8
8
Battery
10
8
8
8
9

Review

Latest MacBook Air is faster, runs longer, costs less

The now-familiar MacBook Air hasn't seen a design overhaul in several generations, and the small update to the 13-inch and 11-inch models released in April 2014 does nothing to change that.

We've tested the new 2014 versions, and found their performance to be slightly improved. (Some have seen different results, owing to Apple using SSDs from multiple manufacturers in Airs, but our tests all fall in line with expectations from this small CPU uptick.) There's certainly no reason to upgrade if you have last year's MacBook Air. Instead, the price cut is the big news here, making this an even more viable option for midprice laptop shoppers.

While the lower price is a plus, the lack of significant performance improvement and the static physical design remind us that the Air is overdue for a more radical overhaul. Balancing out those two factors, our rating remains the same, and the remainder of this review is essentially unchanged from the 2013 version. Both the 11-inch and 13-inch MacBook Airs are still universally useful laptops that are largely frustration-free, but that also lack some of the latest bells and whistles (edge-to-edge glass, touchscreens, higher display resolutions) you may be looking for.

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Specs / Prices

  • MSRP $999
  • Brand Apple
  • Type Core i5
  • Installed Size 4 GB
  • Edition OS X 10.12 Sierra
  • Capacity 128 GB
  • Diagonal Size 13.3 in
See full specs
model 13-inch, 128GB

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