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Cuddly robot

Knitted QR code

Tesla square

Salmonella

Bacteriophage

Microprocessor socks

Streptococcus

Captain Capacitor

Electromagnetic knitting

Neuron socks

Tiny computer

Knit a dissection

Knitting social-media site Ravelry is full of yarn crafters who love to get geeky. Here are some of our favorite projects from that site.

This pattern by Jennifer Olivarez includes instructions for an armature that allows the robot’s wheels to spin and arms to articulate.

Caption by / Photo by Jennifer Olivarez

The code in Irene Birk’s QR pattern is both readable and customizable.

Caption by / Photo by Irene Birk

This pattern, part of Megan-Anne Llama’s year-long knitting project that will honor eight scientists, features a schematic for a Tesla coil.

Caption by / Photo by Megan-Anne Llama

A subset of knitting culture embraces yarny versions of viruses, bacteria and other biological nasties.

Here’s a salmonella by designer LizzieKnits.

Caption by / Photo by LizzieKnits

The projects can get quite elaborate, as evidenced by this crocheted bacteriophage virus.

Caption by / Photo by Susan Burkhart

Designer Heatherly Walker, a self-described “daughter, wife and sister of computer geeks,” grew up attending Atari BBS conventions with her father in the 1980s. She now works for a knitting software company.

This design was inspired by the beauty and symmetry of circuits.

Caption by / Photo by Heatherly Walker

Designer Laurel Jorgensen created this pattern to cheer up a nephew abed with strep throat.

Caption by / Photo by Bookette

Here’s a knit version of an energy-storing capacitor.

Caption by / Photo by Anna Hrachovec

Crafters occasionally knit the capacitor with two other patterns, Resisty the Resistor and a yarn light bulb.

Caption by / Photo by n8kpl/Glenda Andre

This sock by Whitney Gegg-Harrison has a neuron running down the leg.

Caption by / Photo by Whitney Gegg-Harrison

Moore’s Law (which posits that microprocessor components double every two years or so) is likely being pushed to its limits with Anna Hrachovec's knitting pattern.

Caption by / Photo by Jeanette

Emily Stoneking knits dissected creatures such as bats, lab rats and frogs, and sells them, complete with dissection trays, at her Aknitomy Etsy site.

Caption by / Photo by Emily Stoneking
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