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HolidayBuyer's Guide

Toshiba Thrive

Toshiba Thrive

Toshiba Thrive

Toshiba Thrive

Toshiba Thrive

Toshiba Thrive

Toshiba Thrive

Toshiba Thrive

Toshiba Thrive

Toshiba Thrive

Toshiba Thrive

Tablets are generally expected to be "thin and light" small computers with unobtrusive interfaces. Some tablets are thinner and lighter than others, however. While we've praised tablets like the iPad 2 and Galaxy Tab 10.1 for their sleekness and dinged the HP TouchPad for being too bulky, the Thrive poses an interesting question: is a bulky tablet inherently a bad thing or can it justify its extra mass? Check out our full review to find out.
Caption by / Photo by Josh Miller/CNET
The Thrive's In-Plane Switching (IPS)-based panel allows for great viewing angles, but it's still outclassed by the T-Mobile G-Slate's and Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1's screens.
Caption by / Photo by Josh Miller/CNET
The grooved backside adds a level of grip to the tablet.
Caption by / Photo by Josh Miller/CNET
The Toshiba Thrive is the thickest Honeycomb-based tablet we've seen. Here you can see the full-size SD card slot.
Caption by / Photo by Josh Miller/CNET
We think the Thrive's rear camera is ill-placed as evidenced by the fact that our fingers covered it virtually every time we turned it on.
Caption by / Photo by Josh Miller/CNET
Full USB, full HDMI, and Mini-USB ports are some of the reasons why the Thrive is built so heftily.
Caption by / Photo by Josh Miller/CNET
On the left is the panel lock switch.
Caption by / Photo by Josh Miller/CNET
The Toshiba Thrive compared with the Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1. We told you it was thick.
Caption by / Photo by Josh Miller/CNET
To remove the back panel, you'll have to insert your fingernails into that speaker indentation and pull.
Caption by / Photo by Josh Miller/CNET
The back panel is removable and swappable with up to five other colors. The battery is revealed here. It's the large light gray plate on the left.
Caption by / Photo by Josh Miller/CNET
The lithium ion battery can be swapped out and replaced with a fresh one. New batteries are priced at $80 each.
Caption by / Photo by Josh Miller/CNET
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