CNET también está disponible en español.

Ir a español

Don't show this again

HolidayBuyer's Guide

'Lego Space'

Space launch

Curiosity rover

Voyager

Sputnik

Major Golightly finishing his machine

Opportunity rover

Constructing the Gate

Moon landing

Sabotage

Moon base

Ice extraction

Neil Armstrong's footprint

In "Lego Space: Building the Future," Peter Reid and Tim Goddard paint a picture of a fictional futuristic space civilization. Known as "The Federation," the society was created by the world's space agencies during "a time of global peace" and by "the greatest scientific minds of the age [working] together." The entire narrative is told through the presentation of Lego models built by Reid and Goddard.
Caption by / Photo by Reproduced from <a href="http://www.amazon.com/LEGO-Space-Building-Peter-Reid/dp/1593275218/">LEGO Space</a>, with the permission of No Starch Press. © 2013 by Peter Reid and Tim Goddard.
In the book's narrative, space launches, like the one depicted here, became a familiar sight. The moon was used as a major base, and more and more equipment and personnel were transported there, and beyond.
Caption by / Photo by Reproduced from <a href="http://www.amazon.com/LEGO-Space-Building-Peter-Reid/dp/1593275218/">LEGO Space</a>, with the permission of No Starch Press. © 2013 by Peter Reid and Tim Goddard.
In the real-life space history that precedes the beginning of the Federation, NASA's Curiosity rover, seen here in a Lego model, was made to investigate Mars' Gale Crater for signs of biological processes and changes in the Martian atmosphere.
Caption by / Photo by Reproduced from <a href="http://www.amazon.com/LEGO-Space-Building-Peter-Reid/dp/1593275218/">LEGO Space</a>, with the permission of No Starch Press. © 2013 by Peter Reid and Tim Goddard.
Another real-life element of the book is this model of Voyager 1, seen in an image where it is performing a close flyby of Saturn’s moon, Titan.
Caption by / Photo by Reproduced from <a href="http://www.amazon.com/LEGO-Space-Building-Peter-Reid/dp/1593275218/">LEGO Space</a>, with the permission of No Starch Press. © 2013 by Peter Reid and Tim Goddard.
The Russian satellite Sputnik, made here in Legos, traveled around Earth for three months at speeds of 18,000 miles per hour.
Caption by / Photo by Reproduced from <a href="http://www.amazon.com/LEGO-Space-Building-Peter-Reid/dp/1593275218/">LEGO Space</a>, with the permission of No Starch Press. © 2013 by Peter Reid and Tim Goddard.
In Reid and Goddard's story, Major Tom Golightly worked on Tranquility Base, doing "his best work on his own. A scientific prodigy, Golightly rose through the Federation's ranks, helping to create a number of the organization's teams. But there was one problem for exploration of space -- the distances were often too huge to go very far. Golightly had a solution: a machine that could travel faster than the speed of light. Here, Golightly tests out his machine.
Caption by / Photo by Reproduced from <a href="http://www.amazon.com/LEGO-Space-Building-Peter-Reid/dp/1593275218/">LEGO Space</a>, with the permission of No Starch Press. © 2013 by Peter Reid and Tim Goddard.
Another Lego model based on real life, this is the Opportunity rover, which was a hardy explorer, and which lasted far longer than scientists had expected.
Caption by / Photo by Reproduced from <a href="http://www.amazon.com/LEGO-Space-Building-Peter-Reid/dp/1593275218/">LEGO Space</a>, with the permission of No Starch Press. © 2013 by Peter Reid and Tim Goddard.
Reid and Goddard imagined a "Gate," a device that allowed Federation scientists to explore new reaches of space.
Caption by / Photo by Reproduced from <a href="http://www.amazon.com/LEGO-Space-Building-Peter-Reid/dp/1593275218/">LEGO Space</a>, with the permission of No Starch Press. © 2013 by Peter Reid and Tim Goddard.
Clearly, Reid and Goddard hope that readers will understand their futuristic vision of space by understanding the true history of stellar exploration. Among the heroes of space travel, of course, is astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first human on the moon, whose first steps on the lunar surface were watched on television by an estimated 600 million people.
Caption by / Photo by Reproduced from <a href="http://www.amazon.com/LEGO-Space-Building-Peter-Reid/dp/1593275218/">LEGO Space</a>, with the permission of No Starch Press. © 2013 by Peter Reid and Tim Goddard.
Not everything in Reid and Goddard's book is about peace. Here, we see a Lego model depicting a battle, with a pilot wearing a specialized "exo suit."
Caption by / Photo by Reproduced from <a href="http://www.amazon.com/LEGO-Space-Building-Peter-Reid/dp/1593275218/">LEGO Space</a>, with the permission of No Starch Press. © 2013 by Peter Reid and Tim Goddard.
Reid and Goddard imagined fleets of container ships transporting vital resources back to Earth via bases on the moon.
Caption by / Photo by Reproduced from <a href="http://www.amazon.com/LEGO-Space-Building-Peter-Reid/dp/1593275218/">LEGO Space</a>, with the permission of No Starch Press. © 2013 by Peter Reid and Tim Goddard.
In another fictional vision of the future, we see a Lego model of the extraction of specimens from ice on a planet called Ganymede.
Caption by / Photo by Reproduced from <a href="http://www.amazon.com/LEGO-Space-Building-Peter-Reid/dp/1593275218/">LEGO Space</a>, with the permission of No Starch Press. © 2013 by Peter Reid and Tim Goddard.
A Lego representation of the footprint Neil Armstrong left on the moon on July 20, 1969, becoming the first human being to leave one.
Caption by / Photo by Reproduced from <a href="http://www.amazon.com/LEGO-Space-Building-Peter-Reid/dp/1593275218/">LEGO Space</a>, with the permission of No Starch Press. © 2013 by Peter Reid and Tim Goddard.
Updated:
Up Next
The best games and gear you have to...
17