The Samsung Galaxy S II debut

JK Shin, president of Samsung's mobile communications business, unveils the Galaxy S II smartphone at Mobile World Congress. The phone has a dual-core processor, a quad-core graphics processor, a 4.3 AMOLED screen, and a thickness of 8.49mm.
Photo by: Stephen Shankland/CNET

Galaxy Tab 10.1

Samsung pioneered the Android tablet market with a 7-inch model that would fit in a jacket pocket. The Galaxy Tab 10.1, though, is closer to the size of Apple's iPad, which dominates the tablet market.
Photo by: Stephen Shankland/CNET

Samsung Unpacked Dancers

Samsung hired a group of dancers dressed as deliverymen who've been touring Barcelona sights with their packages. They performed for waiting crowds before the Samsung event at Mobile World Congress.
Photo by: Stephen Shankland/CNET

Throngs of Reporters

Hundreds of members of the news media were on hand to cover Samsung's event, packing the venue to the gills.
Photo by: Stephen Shankland/CNET

Galaxy Tab Performance

Samsung hired a small orchestra comprised of musicians from the Royal Academy of Music to play a tune that combined stringed instruments with electronic ones controlled by 7-inch Galaxy Tabs.
Photo by: Stephen Shankland/CNET

JK Shin's vision for mobile

JK Shin, president of Samsung's mobile communications business, sees mobile devices spanning work, home, and the journeys in between.
Photo by: Stephen Shankland/CNET

JK Shin, president of Samsung's mobile communications business

JK Shin, president of Samsung's mobile communications business, makes his case for the Android-based line of Galaxy products.
Photo by: Stephen Shankland/CNET

Galaxy S II's NFC support

"Leave your wallet at home," Samsung says by way of touting the Galaxy S II's near-field communication (NFC) processor. NFC lets a phone communicate with payment terminals in stores, public transit systems, tickets for shows, and advertising--at least that's the vision. For now, until there are pay stations in use, you'd better bring your wallet with you.
Photo by: Stephen Shankland/CNET

Samsung's Reader Hub

Samsung puts four "hubs" on its phone--centers of activity where the company offers software beyond the regular Android collection. One is for reading.
Photo by: Stephen Shankland/CNET

Flash Player 10.1 support

The Samsung Galaxy S II phone supports Adobe Systems' Flash Player 10.1. Adobe has a major push afoot to spread its software to mobile devices, where it's a rarity, unlike on PCs.
Photo by: Stephen Shankland/CNET

Thomas Richter touts Samsung's phone

Thomas Richter, manager of Samsung's telecommunications portfolio in Europe, touts the Galaxy S II.
Photo by: Stephen Shankland/CNET

Samsung lost-phone fixes

If you lose a Galaxy S II, you can use a Web site to make it ring, to put a message on its screen, to track it on a map, to limit and monitor calls, and lock it.
Photo by: Stephen Shankland/CNET

Andrew Coughlin, head of account for Samsung Europe

Andrew Coughlin, head of account for Samsung Europe, flashed the Galaxy S II.
Photo by: Stephen Shankland/CNET

Galaxy S II hardware

Samsung's applications processor is one of a host of dual-core models arriving in the Android realm. The phone also has a quad-core graphics processor.
Photo by: Stephen Shankland/CNET

Galaxy Tab 10.1

A look at the front of the Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1. Samsung boasted it will be the best Android tablet.
Photo by: Stephen Shankland/CNET

Galaxy Tab 10.1

Samsung's Galaxy Tab 10.1 runs Google's Android 3.0, aka Honeycomb. Samsung didn't announce when it plans to ship the tablet or how much it plans to charge.
Photo by: Stephen Shankland/CNET

Back of Galaxy Tab 10.1

A look at the obverse of the Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1.
Photo by: Stephen Shankland/CNET

JK Shin talks to reporters

After the event, Shin mingled with the crowd.
Photo by: Stephen Shankland/CNET

Pick up the Tab

Reporters thronged the 15 Galaxy Tab 10.1 tablets on display.
Photo by: Stephen Shankland/CNET

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