MultiView screen

One of the main reasons to consider the MV900F is its 3.3-inch AMOLED touch-screen display, which is on a hinge, letting you more easily get shots below or above eye level, or put it all the way up for self portraits.

Out in front, by the way, is an ultrawide-angle 5x f2.5-6.3 25-125mm lens. The brighter-than-usual maximum aperture should help keep it from ramping up the ISO sensitivity when you have less light.

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BSI sensor

To help with low-light photos and shooting performance, the MV900F uses a 16-megapixel back-illuminated CMOS sensor.
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Gesture control

With past models, Samsung has used waving to trigger the shutter release when you're taking self portraits. The MV900F introduces gesture controls allowing you to zoom in and out by rotating your hand Karate Kid-style and trigger the shutter by moving your hand up and down.
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Secondary shutter release

Samsung built in a second shutter release on back for when the screen is up.
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Smart Link button

A single button press brings up your Wi-Fi sharing and storage options.
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Wi-Fi options

Samsung's Wi-Fi options are the best and easiest to use of all the camera manufacturers. Its MobileLink and Remote Viewfinder apps let you send photos and videos straight to your Android or iOS device as well as control the camera's zoom and shutter release. It can send shots directly to social networks or e-mail and back them up to computers or cloud services, too. It also has Samsung's AllShare Play DLNA support for use with its connected home theater products.
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Wig mode!

Samsung continues to load up its point-and-shoots with novelty shooting options. Among all of its effects and border options, the MV900F gets a new Wig mode; take a picture, pick a wig, and save.
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Availability

Available in white and black models, the MV900F will be available in late August for about $349.99.
Photo by: Lori Grunin/CNET

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