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This TV died in November, 2010, and has been collecting dust in a corner ever since.

Read the full story of this TV repair project here.

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Removing the back panel was the first step.
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Inside, you can see the four main boards. The power board on the bottom, processor board on the top, and Y and Z sustain boards on either side.
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Removing the support beam was critical, as both the Y-SUS and power boards were connected to it.
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Getting the support beam out of the way was a time-consuming process.
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Lots of screws. I ended up putting most of them back.
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The suspect Y-SUS board.
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My replacement board, ordered from eBay.
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One of the many ribbon cables and connections I had to carefully remove.
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More connections on the Y-SUS board.
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Yet another tiny cable to watch out for.
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With the new board inserted, I tilted the set back upright to test it.
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These screws have to go back in there. Now, if I only remembered which one was which...
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An HDMI input via a laptop worked, surprising no one more than me.
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Hmmm...not really sure where these extra screws were from...
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The only tool I used during the entire process.
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Putting the cover panel back on was one of the final steps.
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Reattaching the back panel of the TV.
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A final successful video test, via HDMI.
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Does anyone want a blown Y-SUS board from a five-year-old plasma?
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Updated:
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