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Designed for those who ride on two wheels, the TomTom Rider comes with all the standard navigation tools, including text- and voice-guided directions, a points-of-interest database, and automatic route recalculation. It also has integrated Bluetooth and supports TomTom's Plus services.

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To help prevent the screen from washing out in sunlight, the Rider features a built-in visor. Though it did a good job, we wish it was just a tad larger.

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You can't really tell, but the power button is located on the right side, and you really have push hard to turn the device on or off.

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Behind the latch is the SD expansion slot where you can load your maps.

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The TomTom Rider comes with an SD card that's preloaded with maps of North America, so it's just plug and go.

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The TomTom Rider comes packaged with a number of accessories, including wired and Bluetooth headsets, a carrying case, an AC adapter, and a screen wipe cloth.

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TomTom provides as part of the package a mounting kit that should fit most motorcycles and scooters. It has four pieces, and you can install the cradle on your handlebar, on a mirror, or on a flat surface with an adhesive mount.

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Here's the TomTom Rider installed on the left handlebar of a 1997 Honda Magna VF750. It was a breeze to install and remove with the provided tools (screws and an Allen wrench).

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From the main menu screen, you can choose to start navigation, make calls, access traffic data (an extra service), or adjust the settings of the unit.

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The TomTom Rider offers you numerous navigation options. Here is a screen that offers directions to your home, a favorite location, a specific address, a recent destination, or a point of interest.

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Other options include searching by intersection, zip code, or city center.

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Using the virtual keyboard and the touch screen, you can enter the city of your choice.

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The TomTom Rider will ask you if you need to arrive at a particular time, so it can prescribe the best route for you to make it to your destination on schedule.

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Once the Rider has calculated your directions, there's an option to get a running demo of the route so you get an overall idea of the trip.

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The map screen shows the street you are on at the top of the screen, and the next destination street or exit at the bottom of the screen. We also had other pertinent information displayed onscreen, such as our speed, the time, the next instruction (arrows and yards to go), and battery life.

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If you want to avoid a certain part of the route, the TomTom Rider can give you alternate directions. The unit also has automatic route recalculation if you happen to get off course.

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The Rider has integrated Bluetooth so you can pair it with your Bluetooth-enabled cell phone and use it as a hands-free speaker system. For our tests, we paired it with the Palm Treo 650.

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While TomTom includes a Bluetooth headset as part of the package, we found the sound quality to be pretty awful. We suggest investing in a better headset, such as the Cardo Scala Rider, pictured here.

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For safety reasons, the Rider will not allow you to make outgoing calls while the bike is moving; however, you can accept incoming calls.

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Phone options include redial, reading and writing text messages, and getting contacts from your mobile's address book.

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