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Alongside its bigger sibling, the 787-10, Boeing's next version of its popular 737 aircraft had its first public appearance at the Paris Air Show. The 737 Max 9 was rolled out of Boeing's factory in Renton, Washington in March and first flew in April.

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The original version of the 737 made its first flight 50 years ago. The Max 9 should enter service in 2018.

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In case you didn't know which plane it is, just look up.

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The brightly painted fuselage will tell you, as well.

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Climb the stairs to get onboard. 

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The Max 9's nose points toward a few business jets parked across the airfield. It was a hot day in Paris, but that didn't stop the crowds from viewing the aircraft on display.

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Inside the cockpit were two of the 737 Max 9's test pilots. 

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No, he didn't pull back on the throttles. That came later when the aircraft made a flyby over the airfield. 

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Inside the cabin are banks of equipment that monitor conditions during test flights.

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The cabin walls and ceiling appear much as they would in a completed aircraft. Just don't look for a carpet on the floor.

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The large wheel lets out a trailing cone on a nylon rope behind the 737 Max 9 when it is flying. The cone measures the airflow disruption behind the airliner.

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Just don't use this door as an exit.

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During flight, technicians sit at computers to monitor flying conditions. The Max 9 will eventually seat 180 to 200 passengers. 

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One feature of the Max family is more efficient engines. As the nacelles are close to the ground, the bottom sides are flattened.

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Like on the 787, the scalloped edges of the engine cowling help reduce noise.

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As we exited out the rear door, we got a view along the full length of the aircraft.

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Another 737 Max 9 improvement is the split-tip winglets, which help improve the wing's efficiency. 

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The highly raked wings of the adjacent 787-10 stretch out to the 737 Max 9. 

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