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Olympus OM-D E-M1X

The E-M1X has a large body not just because of the intetegrated vertical grip, which holds two batteries, but to accommodate the dual TruePic VIII image processors that deliver the power necessary for several of the new capabilities.

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Back

The camera's control layout is typical of its class, with the controls on the vertical grip mirroring those on the regular grip.

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Not too deep

The grip is deep enough to be really comfortable, but the rest of the body requires less depth than an APS-C or full-frame alternative because of the significantly smaller sensor.

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C-Lock

In addition to the options to completely unlock or completely lock the controls, you can can now specify a subset of controls to lock via the switch.

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OK

As is typical for Olympus, the OK button pulls up the options for the main shooting controls. The texture on the navigation buttons and joysticks make them easy to feel and use when your hands are cold.

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Thumb-friendly

The shooting controls on the back are easily reachable with your thumb.

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Drive modes

Olympus has added the drive mode mode button to the top-left shoulder. I much prefer the metering, focus and drive mode controls where they're thumb-accessible and find this location somewhat awkward.

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Top-right controls

The ISO sensitivity button has bumps so you can distinguish it from the exposure compensation button by feel.

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Right side

You can see how hefty the grip is.

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Card slots

The two UHS-II SD card slots have a door lock as part of their weather sealing, like competing models. 

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Left side

It really is a pretty shallow body.

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Connections

The camera has connections for USB-C, micro HDMI, headphones and a mic.

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Battery compartment

The camera uses a typical slide-out tray to hold the batteries.

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Batteries

The tray holds two of the same batteries that the E-M1 Mark II uses. They charge simultaneously via USB-C.

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Front buttons

You can distinguish the buttons on the front of the camera by feel, since one has a divot in the middle.

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150-400mm f/4.5 TC1.25x IS Pro

Given that with the integrated teleconverter this lens has an effective total focal length of between 300mm and 1,000mm, it's pretty small. Those black spots are buttons; there are four so they can be used no matter the orientation of the camera. Olympus doesn't yet have pricing or availability info for it.

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Side switches

There are a lot, though it's not clear what they'll be for -- likely stabilization settings and focus limiters.

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Teleconverter

The lens has a big physical switch for internally slipping the teleconverter into place.

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