Low ISO sensitivity JPEGs

JPEGs look clean through ISO 400, but you can see some slight mangling of details starting at ISO 800.

Photo by: Lori Grunin/CNET

High ISO sensitivity JPEGs

By ISO 3200, sharp and properly illuminated areas show a little degradation, but shadows look mushy. By ISO 6400, you really don't want to use JPEGs at full size.

Photo by: Lori Grunin/CNET

ISO 100 JPEG

Sharp areas look a tiny bit soft -- which actually works in its favor -- in the expanded ISO 100 range.

Photo by: Lori Grunin/CNET

ISO 200 JPEG

Sharp areas can look a little crunchy at ISO 200, the camera's lowest native ISO sensitivity.

Photo by: Lori Grunin/CNET

ISO 400 JPEG

Sharp areas at ISO 400 look very good.

Photo by: Lori Grunin/CNET

ISO 800 JPEG

In-focus areas look fine in ISO 800 JPEGs, but you can see noise-suppression artifacts in the out-of-focus areas.

Photo by: Lori Grunin/CNET

ISO 1600 JPEG

The artifacts in out-of-focus areas are even more pronounced at ISO 1600.

Photo by: Lori Grunin/CNET

ISO 1600 raw vs. JPEG

You can get much better results in high ISO sensitivity images by processing raw files.

Photo by: Lori Grunin/CNET

ISO 3200 JPEG

I probably wouldn't use ISO 3200 JPEGs at full size.

Photo by: Lori Grunin/CNET

Color

Olympus defaults its cameras to the Natural color setting, which delivers pretty accurate results.

Photo by: Lori Grunin/CNET

White balance

I find the standard white balance produces very cool results indoors, and prefer the setting to preserve warm tones.

Photo by: Lori Grunin/CNET

50mm lens bokeh

The 50mm f1.8 delivers very nice out-of-focus highlights for the money.

Photo by: Lori Grunin/CNET

14-42mm lens bokeh

The kit lens delivers pretty typical results.

Photo by: Lori Grunin/CNET

VIDEO

Samsung Galaxy S8's major makeover

This year's flagship phone gets a sexy new design and Bixby, a house-made digital assistant.

Hot Products