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HolidayBuyer's Guide

A Glass dunk

2 on 1, with Glass

"Inherit" the feed

Shooting for three

A new dimension to the game

Choose your player

A player's eye view

Court side views

Choose your player

A cheerleader's view

Point Guard Ray McCallum Jr. dunks during Sacramento Kings practice while wearing Google Glass. Soon, the audience may get the up-close view of the action on the court.
Caption by / Photo by James Martin/CNET
Sacramento Kings shooting guard Orlando Johnson, Point Guard Ray McCallum Jr., and Power Forward Jason Thompson all wear Google Glass as they shoot a few baskets during practice in Sacramento on March 3, 2014.
Caption by / Photo by James Martin/CNET
Tyreke Evans (No. 1) of the New Orleans Pelicans drives against Jason Thompson (No. 4) of the Sacramento Kings on March 3, 2014, at Sleep Train Arena in Sacramento, Calif.
Caption by / Photo by James Martin/CNET
Using CrowdOptic's software to broadcast on-player Google Glass views, anyone using the app can "inherit" the feed, and be able to get the first person view of the action on the court.
Caption by / Photo by James Martin/CNET
Kings shooting guard Orlando Johnson practices his three-pointers while wearing Google Glass, providing a first person view via technology from CrowdOptic.
Caption by / Photo by James Martin/CNET
First person player-to-spectator technology like this could add a whole new dimension to the game, with dozens of alternate views available during every game.
Caption by / Photo by James Martin/CNET
CrowdOptic vice president of business development (and former NFL linebacker) Jim Kovach sat down with CNET's Sumi Das and explained that soon, the audience might have hundreds of offensive, defensive, and court side views to choose from, "They're going to see what they want to see."
Caption by / Photo by James Martin/CNET
Sacramento Kings shooting guard Orlando Johnson goes up for a dunk during practice while wearing Google Glass, providing a first person view via technology from CrowdOptic.
Caption by / Photo by James Martin/CNET
Scott Moak, Vice President of Community Impact, and Executive Director of the Sacramento Kings Foundation, and the Kings announcer, is seen here court side wearing Google Glass during a game against the New Orleans Pelicans on March 3, 2014.
Caption by / Photo by James Martin/CNET
Soon, using Google Glass and CrowdOptic's technology, you may be able to put yourself right in the middle of the action on plays like this.
Caption by / Photo by James Martin/CNET
One of the Sacramento Kings cheerleaders wears Google Glass while dancing during the halftime show. Her view was then broadcast to the arena's JumboTron.
Caption by / Photo by James Martin/CNET
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