iPhone microscope

This iPhone microscope prototype costs roughly $30.
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Photo by: S. Wachsmann-Hogiu, et al/UC Davis / Caption by:

Blood samples

The upper row shows images of blood samples taken with a traditional microscope. From left to right: normal, iron deficiency anemia, and sickle cell anemia. The bottom row shows the same samples imaged via the iPhone.
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Photo by: S. Wachsmann-Hogiu, et al/UC Davis / Caption by:

Sugar crystal

Images of a sugar crystal taken through polarized light filters. Left: traditional microscope. Right: cell phone microscope.
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Photo by: S. Wachsmann-Hogiu, et al/UC Davis / Caption by:

Spectrometer

The spectrum of a fluorescent bulb taken by an iPhone spectrometer. While the iPhone is not as precise as the commercial unit, it accurately picks up the peaks in color intensity.
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Photo by: S. Wachsmann-Hogiu, et al/UC Davis / Caption by:

Pollen and plant stems

Stained samples of pollen (left images) and plant stems (right two images). Top row: commercial microscope. Bottom row: cell phone microscope.
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Photo by: S. Wachsmann-Hogiu, et al/UC Davis / Caption by:
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