Intel looked beyond its roots in its CES 2016 keynote.

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President of the CTA Gary Shapiro says Intel CEO Brian Krzanich has given a CES keynote every year since he took over Intel in 2013.

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Krzanich rolls out on his Segway. More on that later.

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He's also rocking some New Balance sneakers. Again, stay tuned.

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The three big talking points of the keynote were trends shaping the future, said Krzanich: the smart and connected world, technologies gaining human-like senses and computing becoming ultra-personal.

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A drone-powered firework display shows how Intel is "reinventing" traditional experiences.

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Krzanich took part in a League of Legends video game tournament.

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For Team Krzanich, naturally.

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Stephanie Harvey, of the Intel-sponsored pro-gaming team, took centre stage to show off some hardware.

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Krzanich gets 3D scanned...

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...and makes his digital debut.

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FreeD will change the way we watch sports, says the CEO.

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Krzanich puts himself in harm's way...

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...as a partnership with X Games was announced.

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Krzanich was joined on stage by ESPN boss John Skipper, talking about the potential of Intel's Curie chip.

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Red Bull Media House CTO Andreas Gall joins Krzanich.

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Informed observers on the CNET team gave props to this freerunner.

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The new Intel chip tracks the full range of an athlete's movement.

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The Yuneed Typhoon H comes packed with RealSense software, "the world's first truly intelligent drone."

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It's pronounced "unique".

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The drone flies autonomously, and can respond to obstacles in real time, as shown on this bike trail.

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Craig Alexander, three-time Iron Man champion, is on the stage to talk about Intel's partnership with Oakley.

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The new glasses made with Oakley offer everyone access to their own personal trainer. The eyewear is supposed to give real-time feedback and track the progress of an athlete.

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New Balance CEO Rob deMartini announced a new partnership with Intel.

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In future, there will be custom 3D-scanned and printed shoes on offer, just like the ones Krzanich took the stage in.

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The CEO of Daqri intros the Smart Helmet.

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It has an Intel processor and RealSense tech built in.

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The helmet uses augmented reality to give a worker directions when doing manual labour.

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It also offers X-ray and thermal vision.

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Next up: music.

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AR Rahman, who composed the score for the Oscar-winning movie "Slumdog Millionaire", is on stage to talk about Intel's creative offerings.

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The Segway from the intro makes a comeback. And it's actually a robot.

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Becca McCharen, CEO of Chromat, speaks about its partnership with Intel during New York Fashion week.

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Mark Burnett of "Survivor" fame takes the stage.

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Burnett introduced "America's Greatest Makers", a reality show about entrepreneurs launching their projects.

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Intel also doubled down on its commitment to diversity.

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An event on Thursday, in partnership with Vox Media, Re/code and Lady Gaga's Born This Way Foundation will tackle harassment.

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Intel also says it will soon be conflict resource-free.

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