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HolidayBuyer's Guide

Bay Lights Project

25,000 LEDs

Random patterns

LEDs

Full moon

All but a few

Two years

All on

Many directions

Patterns

Almost all

Library

From anywhere

Star Field

Multiple patterns

One tower

SAN FRANCISCO--On March 5, artist Leo Villareal will formally launch The Bay Lights Project, the world's largest LED installation.
Caption by / Photo by Daniel Terdiman/CNET
The Bay Lights Project features 25,000 one-inch LEDs hung on the cables of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge in San Francisco.
Caption by / Photo by Daniel Terdiman/CNET
The project will consist of a nearly infinite number of patterns that are randomly generated and which play for random periods of time.
Caption by / Photo by Daniel Terdiman/CNET
A look at some of the LEDs as the hang off the western side of the Bay Bridge.
Caption by / Photo by Daniel Terdiman/CNET
A near full moon fights through the nighttime fog over the Bay Bridge as the Bay Lights Project delights those who happened to see it being tested.
Caption by / Photo by Daniel Terdiman/CNET
During testing, the artist and his technician sometimes had trouble getting the lights to work properly. When the bridge would go dark, all that remained on was one vertical line of LEDs on a tower -- and permanent lights on top of the bridge.
Caption by / Photo by Daniel Terdiman/CNET
The Bay Lights Project is slated to run for a minimum of two years, starting March 5.
Caption by / Photo by Daniel Terdiman/CNET
A look at the Bay Bridge will all 25,000 LEDs turned on.
Caption by / Photo by Daniel Terdiman/CNET
The patterns that make up the artistry of the Bay Lights Project can move in any direction, and can get brighter, dimmer, can explode, or dissolve, and can have multiple layers.
Caption by / Photo by Daniel Terdiman/CNET
A series of patterns move across the bridge.
Caption by / Photo by Daniel Terdiman/CNET
A pattern of negative space moves across the bridge.
Caption by / Photo by Daniel Terdiman/CNET
Artist Leo Villareal has collected a library of patterns, and when the project launches next month, it will be run from a computer mounted on the bridge that serves up patterns randomly and for random amounts of time.
Caption by / Photo by Daniel Terdiman/CNET
The Bay Lights Project is designed to be visible for miles. However, it was also designed to be nearly invisible to drivers on the bridge.
Caption by / Photo by Daniel Terdiman/CNET
Here, we see part of a pattern Villareal calls a "star field," blended with another pattern.
Caption by / Photo by Daniel Terdiman/CNET
Seen here is evidence that the project can display different patterns on different parts of the bridge.
Caption by / Photo by Daniel Terdiman/CNET
A look at a single tower and the way the LEDs on that tower can be randomly distributed at any given moment.
Caption by / Photo by Daniel Terdiman/CNET
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