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If you can't visit CERN, here's the next best thing (pictures)

A new museum exhibit in London recounts the search for the so-called "God particle," one of the seminal theoretical breakthroughs of the last century.

Charles Cooper
Charles Cooper was an executive editor at CNET News. He has covered technology and business for more than 25 years, working at CBSNews.com, the Associated Press, Computer & Software News, Computer Shopper, PC Week, and ZDNet.
Charles Cooper
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A visitor takes a smartphone photo of a large, back-lit image of the Large Hadron Collider at the Science Museum's "Collider" exhibition in London. At the exhibition, which just opened to the public, visitors will see a theater, video, and sound art installation and artifacts from the LHC, providing a behind-the-scenes look at the CERN particle physics laboratory in Geneva. The show touches on the discovery of the Higgs boson, or God particle, the realization of scientist Peter Higgs' theory, which ranks among the most important scientific breakthroughs of the last century.
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Professor Peter Higgs, co-winner of the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physics.
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Physicists reported in 2012 finding strong hints of the Higgs boson, the elusive "God particle" believed to give objects mass. The Higgs boson is the last missing piece in the standard model of physics.
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Austrian professor Martin Karplus, director of the Biophysical Chemistry laboratory at ISIS (Institut de Science et d'Ingénierie Supramoleculaires) in Strasbourg, France. Karplus won the 2013 Nobel Prize in chemistry for the development of multiscale models for complex chemical systems.
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A magnifying glass highlights a detail of a Vertex Locator on display at the Science Museum's "Collider" exhibition.
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A visitor to the Science Museum walks toward a photograph of the workings of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the "Collider" exhibition.
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An employee of the Science Museum stands in front of a video projection showing the workings of the Large Hadron Collider at the "Collider" exhibition.
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A museum-goer gets his Collider on.
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A visitor to the Science Museum takes a smartphone photo of a video projection showing the workings of the Large Hadron Collider at the "Collider" exhibition.
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CERN's scientists celebrate with champagne after the October announcement of the winners of the Nobel Prize for physics. Peter Higgs of Britain and Francois Englert of Belgium won it for conceiving of the so-called "God particle," which confers mass. The presumed particle was discovered last year by Europe's mega-scale physics lab at CERN, near Geneva, after a decades-long search.

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