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HolidayBuyer's Guide

There are three main types of partial colour blindness: Red deficiency (protanopia), green deficiency (deuteranopia) and blue deficiency (tritanopia).

Image created using Color Oracle.

Caption by / Photo by NASA, ESA, and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)

The suffix -anopia refers to a complete absence of the cones that detect light, whereas -anomaly, as in deuteranomaly, tritanomaly and protanomaly, means the cones are present but mutated.

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Caption by / Photo by NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona

Roughly one percent of men have protanopia, and another one percent have deuteranopia. Deuteranomaly is the most common, affecting six percent of men and 0.4 percent of women.

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Caption by / Photo by Zeynel Cebeci

Tritanopia affects less than one percent of men and women, and tritanomaly affects less than 0.01 percent of men and women.

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Caption by / Photo by Wolfgang Roth

Most of the genes involved in colour blindness are on the X chromosome, which is why men are affected more than women.

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Caption by / Photo by Michael Maggs

Monochromacy is complete colour blindness. People with this condition see the world in black and white.

Want to check your colour perception? The EnChroma website has an easy Ishihara test.

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Caption by / Photo by Wassily Kandinsky, public domain
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