CNET también está disponible en español.

Ir a español

Don't show this again

Ubuntu is coming to smartphones and tablets. Let's take a look at the software that hopes to challenge Android. It launches on new phones like this one some time this year. Here's Ubuntu for phones and tablets running on a Google Nexus 5 phone and Nexus 7 slate, ahead of the arrival of the first phones, the Meizu MX3 and BQ Aquaris. The OS was previously known as Ubuntu Touch.
Updated:Caption:Photo:Rich Trenholm/CNET
1
of 20
Ubuntu is based around souped-up home screens called "scopes."
Updated:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNET
2
of 20
Some scopes look familiar, like this gallery app gathering your videos.
Updated:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNET
3
of 20
Here's the photo gallery.
Updated:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNET
4
of 20
Scopes are sort of a cross between a home page, an app, and a widget, and can be themed like this soccer-celebrating World Cup scope.
Updated:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNET
5
of 20
You can scroll through embedded carousels and tap to see more. Other possible uses include a scope made by your network or carrier to put your account profile, your bill, and useful links in one place.
Updated:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNET
6
of 20
Here you can see your apps, with recently used apps at the top for quick access.
Updated:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNET
7
of 20
Swipe in from the left for the app launcher, packed with your favorite shortcuts.
Updated:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNET
8
of 20
Swipe up from the bottom when you're in an app for the app's menu.
Updated:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNET
9
of 20
Swipe in from the right to scroll back and forth through your currently open apps with this multitasking carousel.
Updated:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNET
10
of 20
The multitasking carousel doesn't disappear when you take your finger off the screen, so you can come back to it if you're interrupted.
Updated:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNET
11
of 20
Swipe down from the top to see your notifications and status updates.
Updated:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNET
12
of 20
As you swipe down, scroll sideways to see useful stuff such as recent messages or your network or battery status.
Updated:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNET
13
of 20
Settings are also in the pull-down tray.
Updated:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNET
14
of 20
Here you can see how long your battery is going to last.
Updated:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNET
15
of 20
Ubnutu is designed to be the same on phones and tablets.
Updated:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNET
16
of 20
One unique tablet feature is this multitasking window.
Updated:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNET
17
of 20
Pull the multitasking window in from the right and you can use the app without leaving the main app, perhaps doing a quick calculation or checking a message.
Updated:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNET
18
of 20
Ubuntu on tablet.
Updated:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNET
19
of 20
The first two phones to bring Ubuntu to consumers will be the Spanish-made BQ Aquaris, pictured on the left, and the Chinese Meizu MX3.
Updated:Caption:Photo:Rich Trenholm/CNET
20
of 20
Up Next

21 hidden Galaxy S9 and S9 Plus features