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HolidayBuyer's Guide

Google Pacman

Atari Breakout

A wibbly wobbly timey wimey Easter egg

Dinorunner

Zerg Rush!

Google Earth flight simulator

Google Earth flight simulator

Bacon Number

Google gravity search

Flip a Coin/Roll a Die

Google in 1998

Google barrel roll

I'm Feeling Lucky?

Conway's Game of Life

Blink HTML

Use the Force, Luke

Beam me up, Scotty

Google Maps jet-ski advice

Google off kilter

Google 42 search

Google ASCII art search

Google blue moon search

Google anagram search

Google pirate interface

Google hacker interface

Ooglegay Earchsay

Recursive recursion

Self-absorbed LMGTFY

Ninjas on Google Reader

Google Maps' pegman in Legoland

This was originally a Google Doodle (the best Doodle, in my opinion), celebrating the 30th anniversary of Pacman. Type "Google Pacman" into the search box, and a playable version of Google Pacman will pop up. Play with your arrow keys.

Caption by / Photo by Screenshot by Sarah Jacobsson Purewal/CNET

Perform a Google search for "Atari Breakout," and then browse the "Images" search result tab. You'll be treated to a playable version of the game.

Caption by / Photo by Screenshot by Fox Van Allen

First, perform a Google search for "Police Telephone Box."

Choose the "Maps" search result tab and you'll be taken to one very specific box in London. Switch over to Street View, and attempt to navigate yourself into the box.

If you do everything right, you'll wind up inside the Dr. Who TARDIS time machine.

Caption by / Photo by Screenshot by Fox Van Allen

Typically, seeing the "There is no Internet connection" notification in your browser is a bummer. But if you use Google Chrome, you can unlock a simple-but-addictive runner mini game by pressing your keyboard space bar while on the page.

Watch out for the cacti, brave dino!

Caption by / Photo by Screenshot by Fox Van Allen

Type "zerg rush" into Google's search box, and your search results will be attacked by red and yellow Os acting like zerglings in the real-time strategy game StarCraft. If you do nothing, the Os will quickly eat up all the search results and eventually spell out GG (Good game) on your screen. But you're not without defense -- click on the Os to shoot them with your mouse before they eat up all your results. A score box on the right side of the screen records your APM (actions per minute) and how many zergling Os you successfully destroy.

Caption by / Photo by Screenshot by Sarah Jacobsson Purewal/CNET

Google Earth has a built-in flight simulator. It helpfully offers to start you out at Kathmandu for some exciting views of the Himalayan mountains.

Caption by / Photo by Screenshot by Stephen Shankland/CNET

To load the Google Earth flight simulator, type Ctrl-Alt A or Cmd-Opt A on a Mac. You'll have your choice of planes. Flying is another matter altogether, but the place to get started if you lack a joystick is the Google Earth keyboard controls help page.

Caption by / Photo by Screenshot by Stephen Shankland/CNET

Six degrees of Kevin Bacon? Type a celebrity's name plus "Bacon number" into Google, and Google will tell you how many degrees away from Kevin Bacon they are.

Caption by / Photo by Screenshot by Sarah Jacobsson Purewal/CNET

The Google Gravity chrome experiment by Mr. Doob is amusing--especially since the search page still works, with new search results piling up.

Caption by / Photo by Screenshot by Stephen Shankland/CNET

Need to make a rash decision? Type "flip a coin" into Google and a coin-flipping simulator will pop up. Likewise, you can also type "roll a die" into Google to get a die simulator.

Caption by / Photo by Screenshot by Sarah Jacobsson Purewal/CNET

Type "Google in 1998" into the Google search box, and the Google page will transform into, well...what Google looked like in 1998, when it first launched, complete with 1998's search results courtesy of the Wayback Machine. (Click "Take me back to the present" to get real search results about Google in 1998.)

Caption by / Photo by Screenshot by Sarah Jacobsson Purewal/CNET

Searching for "do a barrel roll" at Google--or for "z or r twice" produces a dynamically spinning view of the search site.

Caption by / Photo by Screenshot by Stephen Shankland/CNET

The Google homepage has an I'm Feeling Lucky button, which takes you directly to the top result for your search query. But if you don't have a search query, you can roll over I'm Feeling Lucky to get different feelings -- I'm Feeling Artistic, I'm Feeling Puzzled, and I'm Feeling Trendy are just some of the options. Click the button to go to a Google-curated page for each feeling, e.g., I'm Feeling Hungry takes you to the search results for restaurants, while I'm Feeling Wonderful takes you to the Google Cultural Institute and displays a world wonder.

Caption by / Photo by Screenshot by Sarah Jacobsson Purewal/CNET

A Google search for "Conway's Game of Life" yields a life simulation. For those of you who have no idea what I'm talking about, Conway's Game of Life is a zero-player game that uses a set of rules to evolve from its initial state. Google's Game of Life evolves to spell Google (if you watch it for a while).

Caption by / Photo by Screenshot by Sarah Jacobsson Purewal/CNET

Type "blink HTML" into the search box, and you'll get a list of blinking search results. (Only the word blink will be blinking, so it probably won't cause any seizures.)

Caption by / Photo by Screenshot by Sarah Jacobsson Purewal/CNET

Type "Use the Force, Luke" into the YouTube search box to get a list of results that are being, ahem, affected by the Force -- moving randomly around the page, wavering back and forth, etc.

Caption by / Photo by Screenshot by Sarah Jacobsson Purewal/CNET

Type "Beam me up, Scotty" into the YouTube search box, and your results will be beamed down (up?) one by one.

Caption by / Photo by Screenshot by Sarah Jacobsson Purewal/CNET

Google Maps has creative solutions for some navigational difficulties. One is its advice to take a jet ski from China to Japan.

(The new version of Google Maps simply says it cannot calculate a route from China to Japan.)

Caption by / Photo by Screenshot by Stephen Shankland/CNET

A Google search for tilt or askew yields an appropriately off-kilter view of the search site.

Caption by / Photo by Screenshot by Stephen Shankland/CNET

Ask Google the answer to the question of life, the universe, and everything and, in a tribute to "A Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy," you'll get the number 42.

Caption by / Photo by Screenshot by Stephen Shankland/CNET

ASCII art is imagery made of monospaced letters named after the storied character encoding scheme. Search for ASCII art on Google and you get a fittingly adapted Google logo.

(This Easter egg no longer works.)

Caption by / Photo by Screenshot by Stephen Shankland/CNET

How often does the world experience a blue moon? Google Calculator results in Google search knows and will tell you.

Caption by / Photo by Screenshot by Stephen Shankland/CNET

Search for anagram at Google and the top result is, in fact, an anagram.

Caption by / Photo by Screenshot by Stephen Shankland/CNET

Buccaneers or those sailing under a letter of marque might feel more comfortable with Google's Pirate interface. There's one for the Muppets' Swedish Chef, too.

Caption by / Photo by Screenshot by Stephen Shankland/CNET

Want to experience Google through a l33t interface? Try the Google Hacker page.

Caption by / Photo by Screenshot by Stephen Shankland/CNET

Google comes with a Pig Latin interface if you want it.

Caption by / Photo by Screenshot by Stephen Shankland/CNET

Self-reference is just the sort of mathematical amusement that entertains Google nerds. Searching for "recursion" suggests that perhaps you meant to search for "recursion."

Caption by / Photo by Screenshot by Stephen Shankland/CNET

This isn't a Google Easter egg, and maybe isn't even an Easter egg at all. Instead it's with the sarcasm-laden Let Me Google That For You site, which people can use when others ask them silly questions easily answered with a search engine. This particular cached LMGTFY page, though, sets things off in an unending loop of reloading.

Caption by / Photo by Screenshot by Stephen Shankland/CNET

Google Reader comes with a Ninja Easter egg. To get a look, type the classic video game cheat code: up, up, down, down, left, right, left, right, B, A.

(Google Reader no longer exists, so this Easter egg is now defunct.)

Caption by / Photo by Screenshot by Stephen Shankland/CNET

Google Maps' pegman character, used to signify the perspective of the street view feature, changes on special occasions. And when he shows up at Legoland in Carlsbad, Calif., he turns into a Lego character.

(The new version of Google Maps no longer shows pegman as a Lego character.)

Caption by / Photo by Screenshot by Stephen Shankland/CNET
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