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Have you been wondering what Fitbit's been up to? After a long hiatus the company has announced three new wearable fitness gadgets: the Charge, Charge HR and Surge (left to right). We'll explain them for you.

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Photo by: Sarah Tew/CNET

The Fitbit Charge HR will cost $150 in the US, £120 in the UK and $180 in Australia, and won't arrive until early 2015. It measures your heart rate continuously.

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Photo by: Sarah Tew/CNET

An optical heart-rate sensor on the back distinguishes it from the Fitbit Charge, which is a pedometer and sleep tracker arriving this November.

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Photo by: Sarah Tew/CNET

A more watch-like buckle keeps the Charge HR on your wrist more securely than the old Fitbit Force.

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Photo by: Sarah Tew/CNET

The Charge HR lasts up to 5 days while measuring your heart rate all day and night. It can track your baseline heart rate and use it to find workout-based target heart-rate zones.

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The Fitbit Charge HR in purple: it'll be available in several colors.

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Photo by: Sarah Tew/CNET

The Fitbit Surge is a more expensive workout smartwatch. It costs $250 in the US, £200 in the UK and $300 in Australia, and, like the Charge HR, won't arrive until  early 2015.

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Photo by: Sarah Tew/CNET

The Surge also has continuous heart rate tracking, but adds an LCD touchscreen and built-in GPS to track workouts and runs.

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The Surge can receive text messages and caller ID from compatible iPhones, Android and Windows phones. A music control function also plays and skips tracks on your phone via Bluetooth. But the Surge won't get other notifications.

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A standard watch band fits securely, but the Surge's design is slightly wider than other watches.

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These side buttons are used to start and stop workouts.

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The fitness-watch market's getting crowded, but the Surge aims to compete with more dedicated sports trackers, as well as fitness watches like the Basis Peak.

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Will early 2015 be too late for the Fitbit Surge, or perfect timing? Stay tuned.

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A look at the Surge's optical heart-rate tracker.

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Fitbit's app will be redesigned to take advantage of these new devices.

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New achievements and challenges are part of the redesigned app.

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A look at how heart-rate data is displayed on Fitbit's app: all-day heart-rate progress can be charted and synced.

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Photo by: Sarah Tew/CNET

The Fitbit Charge, coming out this fall, is a replacement to the discontinued Fitbit Force. Like the Force, which went on sale last year, the Charge tracks steps, elevation, and has automatic sleep tracking.

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A newly designed band aims to attach more securely (the Force had a habit of flying off wrists). The material's also been changed to avoid skin rashes.

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It looks and behaves much like the old Force, with some additions: improved automatic sleep tracking, and caller ID from compatible Windows phones, Android phones and iPhones. The Charge costs $130 in the US, £100 in the UK and $150 in Australia.

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The Fitbit Charge and Charge HR side by side. They really do look alike. The Charge HR doesn't cost much more, but won't arrive until next year.

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Photo by: Sarah Tew/CNET

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