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HolidayBuyer's Guide

ISO 100

ISO 200

ISO 400

Continuous shooting

ISO 3200

ISO 6400

ISO 12800 (High)

Multiple exposures

In-camera HDR

Normally I'd provide full-resolution photo samples -- scaled-down shots make great slideshows but don't provide any information about the actual photo quality. However, since the camera firmware isn't final it doesn't make sense to have the full-resolution shots hanging around in perpetuity.

(ISO 6400, 1/400 sec, f1.6, Sigma 50mm f1.4 lens, raw exposure adjusted +0.7)

(Shot with a preproduction unit; may not be representative of shipping model.)

Caption by / Photo by Lori Grunin/CNET

(1/125 sec., f3.5, Sigma 50mm f1.4 lens)

(Shot with a preproduction unit; may not be representative of shipping model.)

Caption by / Photo by Lori Grunin/CNET

(1/250 sec., f5, Sigma 50mm f1.4 lens)

(Shot with a preproduction unit; may not be representative of shipping model.)

Caption by / Photo by Lori Grunin/CNET

(1/100 sec., f10, Canon 24-105mm f4 lens)

(Shot with a preproduction unit; may not be representative of shipping model.)

Caption by / Photo by Lori Grunin/CNET

One benefit of the higher resolution is that even if a shot isn't perfectly sharp, it often passes for acceptable when scaled down. That's a big benefit for continuous shooting, where you frequently have to boost the ISO sensitivity in order to be able to raise the shutter speed high enough to grab action. Here I got away with a slightly lower shutter speed. The photo isn't that sharp, but at this size it passes.

(ISO 800, 1/125 sec., f1.4, Sigma 50mm f1.4 lens)

(Shot with a preproduction unit; may not be representative of shipping model.)

Caption by / Photo by Lori Grunin/CNET

(1/200 sec., f1.8, Sigma 50mm f1.4 lens)

(Shot with a preproduction unit; may not be representative of shipping model.)

Caption by / Photo by Lori Grunin/CNET

(1/160 sec., f2.8, Sigma 50mm f1.4 lens)

(Shot with a preproduction unit; may not be representative of shipping model.)

Caption by / Photo by Lori Grunin/CNET

(1/400 sec., f1.4, Sigma 50mm f.14 lens)

(Shot with a preproduction unit; may not be representative of shipping model.)

Caption by / Photo by Lori Grunin/CNET

The camera lets you choose as many photos as you want to overlay, plus it saves the result as a raw as well as a JPEG, if you're shooting raw+JPEG. That's a nice perk for when you want to tweak the results.

(Shot with a preproduction unit; may not be representative of shipping model.)

Caption by / Photo by Lori Grunin/CNET

The camera offers four types of HDR, one natural and three "Art" variations, plus the ability to choose +/-1, 2 or 3 EV in addition to auto. On the left is the natural setting (the inset shows the "correct" single exposure); on the right is the Art Standard setting. You can save both raw and JPEG versions of each of the bracketed photos from which the final result is built. While you might be able to get away with shooting handheld, as I did here, the results are soft because of slight misalignments.

(Shot with a preproduction unit; may not be representative of shipping model.)

Caption by / Photo by Lori Grunin/CNET
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