CNET también está disponible en español.

Ir a español

Don't show this again

Before

The magnitude 7.0 earthquake that struck Haiti on Tuesday occurred along the strike-slip fault line that separates the Caribbean and North American tectonic plates, just 10 miles southwest of the capital city, Port-Au-Prince.

The quake, the largest in the region in more than 200 years, has been devastating, and throughout Port-Au-Prince buildings have collapsed, leaving people trapped and streets blocked with the ruins of fallen buildings.

Photo by: Google/DigitalGlobe

After

Here is the same area as seen after the earthquake.
Photo by: Google/DigitalGlobe

Before

This image from Google shows Champs de Mars plaza on an average day in 2008 before the devastating quake struck.
Photo by: Google/DigitalGlobe

After

The normally calm Champs de Mars plaza in front of the the Presidential Palace has, like other public spaces throughout the city, become a place to gather and to seek refuge from the destruction caused by the earthquake.
Photo by: Google/DigitalGlobe

A neighborhood in Port-Au-Prince, before.

A neighborhood in Port-Au-Prince, before.
Photo by: Google/DigitalGlobe

Poorly maintained

According to the Encyclopedia of Nations, "Haiti's infrastructure is primitive and poorly maintained, the result of decades of under-investment and environmental damage."

The poor infrastructure accelerated the damage caused by the quake, inflicting an unusually high toll for a quake with magnitude of 7.0.

Here, the same area is seen after the quake.

Photo by: Google/DigitalGlobe

Before

A building near the city's center before the quake.
Photo by: Google/DigitalGlobe

Destruction

The same building after Tuesday's earthquake.
Photo by: Google/DigitalGlobe

Stade Sylvio Cator, after

The 30,000-person multipurpose stadium Stade Sylvio Cator, named for Haitian Olympic medalist long jumper Sylvio Cator, as seen before the quake in 2008.
Photo by: Google/DigitalGlobe

Stade Sylvio Cator, before

The Stade Sylvio Cator was damaged in the earthquake, and its grounds have now become a safe haven for earthquake refugees.
Photo by: Google/DigitalGlobe

Boulevard JeanJaques Dessalines

A corner building along Boulevard Jean-Jaques Dessalines before Tuesday's quake.
Photo by: Google/DigitalGlobe

Boulevard JeanJaques Dessalines

The same corner building after it collapsed, partially blocking the surrounding streets.
Photo by: Google/DigitalGlobe

Presidential Palace

The Presidential Palace prior to its collapse in the earthquake on Tuesday.
Photo by: Google/DigitalGlobe

Presidential Palace collapse

The Presidential Palace in the Champs de Mars plaza was nearly destroyed following Tuesday's quake.
Photo by: Google/DigitalGlobe

Before the collapse

A block of buildings near the Presidential Palace before the earthquake.
Photo by: Google/DigitalGlobe

Near the Presidential Palace

The same block near the Presidential Palace collapsed into the street after the quake.
Photo by: Google/DigitalGlobe

REVIEW

Meet the drop-resistant Moto Z2 Force

The Moto Z2 Force is really thin, with a fast processor and great battery life. It can survive drops without shattering.

Hot Products