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Avegant Glyph: Headphones that project to your eyes (pictures)

An up-close peek at the Glyph Founder's Edition and its wild lenses.

Scott Stein
I started with CNET reviewing laptops in 2009. Now I explore wearable tech, VR/AR, tablets, gaming and future/emerging trends in our changing world. Other obsessions include magic, immersive theater, puzzles, board games, cooking, improv and the New York Jets. My background includes an MFA in theater which I apply to thinking about immersive experiences of the future.
Scott Stein
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1 of 12 Sarah Tew/CNET

The Avegant Glyph is a head-mounted display, but it's cleverly hidden in what looks like a pair of headphones.

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2 of 12 Sarah Tew/CNET

Hidden in the Glyph's band are two lenses that project images to your retinas. Do not be afraid.

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3 of 12 Sarah Tew/CNET

The 720p display feels like watching a super-bright HDTV in a tiny movie theater.

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4 of 12 Sarah Tew/CNET

The Glyph Founder's Edition also has good-sounding audio. But these aren't cheap: they're $700 (about £500 or AU$980).

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5 of 12 Sarah Tew/CNET

The design is thicker than most headphones.

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Lots of inputs: Micro-HDMI and Micro-USB, plus a standard headphone jack.

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The Glyph's earpieces are click controllers: sound, brightness and toggling to 3D mode when available.

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8 of 12 Sarah Tew/CNET

The lenses are separately adjustable, can be shifted for different eye distances, and can be focused independently.

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9 of 12 Sarah Tew/CNET

CNET en Español's Juan Garzon tries a pair.

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10 of 12 Sarah Tew/CNET

Even when wearing them, the Glyph still lets you see above and below for safety. But it means you're not fully isolated.

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11 of 12 Sarah Tew/CNET

Connecting to an iPhone means you need a separate Lightning-to-HDMI adapter, which gets clunky.

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Glyph gets about 4 hours of video playback before needing a recharge. But you can plug it into anything with HDMI: your computer, game console, tablet or whatever else you can think of.

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