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Welcome to BOS7

This is Amazon's Fall River fulfillment center, also named BOS7, which opened in September 2016.

Published:Caption:Photo:Ben Fox Rubin/CNET
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It's the size of 26 football fields

The 1.2 million-square-foot location was built specifically to handle big and bulky items.

Published:Caption:Photo:Ben Fox Rubin/CNET
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Tens of thousands of packages shipped daily

The location employs 1,300 full-time workers and on a regular day can ship 80,000 to 100,000 items.

Published:Caption:Photo:Ben Fox Rubin/CNET
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Millions of products stored

Inside the cavernous space, there are seemingly endless rows of multistory shelving filled with pallets of tens of millions of products. 

Published:Caption:Photo:Ben Fox Rubin/CNET
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Picking up customer orders

This stuff is picked up for packaging and shipping by an army of over 200 powered industrial trucks, which are fitted with forklifts that extend to the highest shelves.

Published:Caption:Photo:Ben Fox Rubin/CNET
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Storage for long and thin items

Other stuff is stored in the mezzanine, where a bunch of cardboard rolls are filled with long, thin items like curtain rods. 

Published:Caption:Photo:Ben Fox Rubin/CNET
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Including a javelin

And this javelin, being shown off by BOS7 general manager Rich Hanna.

Published:Caption:Photo:Ben Fox Rubin/CNET
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For the Shadow Trooper lover

Near those rolls is a shelving space holding a bunch of random products that don't fit well on pallets, like this Star Wars Supreme Edition Shadow Trooper costume.

Published:Caption:Photo:Ben Fox Rubin/CNET
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They've even got a kitchen sink

Or this two-basin kitchen sink for restaurants.

Published:Caption:Photo:Ben Fox Rubin/CNET
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The conveyor system

Most of the products at the fulfillment center can go through the conveyor belts and automated system, which seals and stamps the boxes.

Published:Caption:Photo:Ben Fox Rubin/CNET
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10 miles of conveyor belts

There are more than 10 miles of conveyors weaving throughout the building.

Published:Caption:Photo:Ben Fox Rubin/CNET
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Hauling Amazon orders

Other items that can't go on conveyors need to be hauled over to a custom packaging machine.

Published:Caption:Photo:Ben Fox Rubin/CNET
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The BOD machine

This is one of those machines, called a box on demand, or BOD, machine. It can suck up three different sizes of cardboard box material and cut it to exact specifications.

Published:Caption:Photo:Ben Fox Rubin/CNET
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The machine operator

A machine operator takes out the flat custom boxes as they come out of the machine and hands them off to an assembler.

Published:Caption:Photo:Ben Fox Rubin/CNET
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The assembler

The assembler then puts together and packs the new boxes.

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BOD crew

Here's one BOD team at the Fall River location.

Published:Caption:Photo:Ben Fox Rubin/CNET
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That's a wrap

OK, thanks for visiting.

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