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Visually impaired photogs display mind-boggling shots

The shots recently displayed at University of California at Riverside are inspiring, considering that most photographers won't know where the camera lens is pointing.

Gerardo Nigenda shot
Gerardo Nigenda stays aware of sounds, memories, and other sensations while shooting. He then uses a Braille writer to express what he felt felt directly on the photo. Gerardo Nigenda, courtesy of UCR/California Museum of Photography

Twelve visually impaired artists, a few of whom are totally blind, recently showed some amazing images as part of an exhibit called Sight Unseen at the University of California at Riverside.

The shots they took are inspiring, considering that most won't know where the camera lens is pointing. Rosita McKenzie said she could be experimental as she can't see. Her method was to sense the light on her face (possibly from the heat radiated by the light source), hear the rustle of the wind, or use her sense of smell to identify fragrances in the air to get an idea of her environment.

Another photographer, Pete Eckert, believes being blind gives him an advantage over shutterbugs who can see. His rationale is that vision can get in the way, and seeing less may be more.

My favorite quote is from Victorine Floyd Fludd, who said: "A good picture comes not from the outside, but from within."

Time.com has a slideshow of 18 images from these photographers. Do check them out if you are curious to see how the visually impaired view the world.

Rosita McKenzie shot
Rosita McKenzie, who took this shot of Aberdeen University, senses light on her face, listens to the wind, or uses her sense of smell to identify her environment. Rosita McKenzie, courtesy of UCR/California Museum of Photography

(Source: Crave Asia via Trendhunter)