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Just 2 months ahead of Olympics, US issues do-not-travel advisory for Japan

Team USA says it's "confident" it can safely compete in the Tokyo Olympic Games.

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The US has issued an advisory against travel to Japan. 

Edited by Jessica Dolcourt/CNET
For the most up-to-date news and information about the coronavirus pandemic, visit the WHO and CDC websites.

Japan has just been labeled a higher COVID-19 threat: On Monday, the US State Department issued a Level 4: Do Not Travel advisory for the nation. Also on Monday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention posted a travel notice stating "travelers should avoid all travel to Japan." 

With the Olympic Games slated to finally kick off on July 23, just two months from now, this could affect Team USA's participation. The Tokyo Olympics had been delayed from its 2020 schedule due to the coronavirus pandemic. In March, the event's organizers said the Summer Olympics and Paralympics in Tokyo won't be open to spectators traveling from outside Japan.

Read more: The Tokyo Olympics: Will the games be canceled, expected start date, full schedule

Team USA said it's aware of the updated travel advisory, but is "confident" it can safely compete this summer. 

"We feel confident that the current mitigation practices in place for athletes and staff by both the USOPC and the Tokyo Organizing Committee, coupled with the testing before travel, on arrival in Japan and during games time, will allow for safe participation of Team USA," the United States Olympic and Paralympic Committee said in an emailed statement.

Last month, the US issued Level 4: Do Not Travel advisories for around 80% of all nations. The travel advisories were updated to reflect the CDC's COVID-19 health notices about other countries. Japan was initially left off the Level 4 warning list, but was added Monday.

Read more: Vaccine passports for COVID-19: How they'll be a part of global travel