CNET también está disponible en español.

Ir a español

Don't show this again

Digital Media

Twitter will now help you thread tweets

A new feature from the social network should streamline things when you create a chain of tweets.

You know those times when the space of a single tweet isn't enough?

Prolific tweeters like President Trump will soon be able to thread together tweets and publish them at the same time.

Getty Images

Well, the days of laboriously "threading," or chaining tweets together, will soon be gone. Twitter is going to institute a threading feature designed to make it easier for you to jot down thoughts in a series. (Remember how Twitter had to provide these threading tips, involving replies to yourself, back in 2014?)

The change will let you assemble and publish your threaded tweets all at the same time.

Threading has already become a go-to activity for some people.

For instance, Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey in October used an eight-tweet thread to describe how the company will more aggressively enforce its rules about unwanted sexual advances, hate symbols, violent groups and tweets that glorify violence.

Then there's President Trump, who went on a tweetstorm on Dec. 3 in which he targeted the Justice Department, the FBI, ABC News investigative reporter Brian Ross and his presidential opponent, Hillary Clinton.

Or -- awwww. This "Pupdate" thread from the CIA a couple months back chronicled why adorable Lulu wasn't interested in being a bomb-sniffing canine.

Oh, and who can forget this epic, 127-tweet thread that went viral a year ago: Strategic intelligence analyst Eric Garland went on and on about how nearly every event in American political history led to Russia interfering with last year's presidential election. 

Garland became an overnight internet sensation as his Twitter account spiked from 5,000 to 50,000 followers, who both praised or poked fun at his diatribe. He currently has more than 171,000 followers.

And of course, our social team is very excited about the new feature...

'Alexa, be more human': Inside Amazon's effort to make its voice assistant smarter, chattier and more like you.

Crowd Control: A crowdsourced science fiction novel written by CNET readers.