Trump boasts his Twitter power keeps Kaepernick unemployed

Commentary: During a speech in Kentucky, the president relates that NFL owners are too scared of his wrath.

Technically Incorrect offers a slightly twisted take on the tech that's taken over our lives.


The man with Twitter power.

CNN screenshot by Chris Matyszczyk/CNET

Donald Trump has promised to bring jobs back to America.

He does seem proud, however, to be involved in keeping one American out of work.

Former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick, who once played in the Super Bowl, is now more famous for refusing to stand for the national anthem before NFL games (and for not voting).

For this, he was both admired and pilloried.

On Monday, however, the president seemed delighted that Kaepernick currently has no team. Speaking in Louisville, Kentucky, the president meandered onto the subject of the former Niner.

"Your San Francisco quarterback, I'm sure nobody ever heard of him," began Trump. "It was reported that NFL owners don't want to pick him up because they don't want to get a nasty tweet from Donald Trump. Do you believe that? I just saw that. I just saw that."

Oh, I believe it. NFL owners aren't the most imaginative of sorts. They also tend to drift toward the conservative side of things.

Moreover, Donald Trump's tweets carry with them hardy heft.

They've been known to affect stock prices.

Then again, Monday also saw a House Committee meeting in which the president's tweets were put under considerable scrutiny and found somewhat wanting.

His assertion, for example, that his phones had been wiretapped by President Barack Obama was, said FBI Director James Comey, unfounded.

Attempts to contact Kaepernick were unsuccessful. The quarterback is currently busy raising money for food and water to send to Somalia.

Given the consistency with which NFL quarterbacks get injured, perhaps Kaepernick will still find a job. Some might find poetry if he ended up in New York. Perhaps he could then pop over to Trump Tower for tea.

As for Twitter, Kaepernick tends to use it for retweeting, rather than speaking his own words. There's a certain power in that too.

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