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Why you shouldn't use a vacuum cleaner to make a ponytail

Technically Incorrect: An Australian morning show sees a production assistant in agony as a so-called expert uses a vacuum cleaner hose to fashion her ponytail.

Technically Incorrect offers a slightly twisted take on the tech that's taken over our lives.


She's not happy. It's understandable.

Biggest Show/YouTube screenshot by Chris Matyszczyk/CNET

Morning television does have its mishaps.

You've surely not forgotten the Polish illusionist who impaled a TV presenter with a nail.

I now present the Australian do-it-yourself expert who appeared on the nation's Channel 9 and tried to show how easy it it to make the perfect ponytail using a vacuum cleaner.

Perhaps this idea had never crossed your mind. Perhaps this is because it may not be the finest of ideas.

In this case, a production assistant is the victim as Rob Palmer -- known as the TV tradie -- attempts to use a vacuum cleaner for an original purpose.

Palmer tries to tell the production assistant -- named Jen -- not to worry. He's done this before with his 8-year-old daughter.

Indeed, he says he got the inspiration from a YouTube video that showed a dad doing it.

As the TV presenters laugh, Jen tries to. Soon, it's rather clear that this encounter with fame is hurting.

Rob's salon manner is akin to that of a lumberjack trying to do origami. As he yanks the vacuum cleaner hose away from Jen's head, you wince at the sheer heffalumpitude of his carelessness.

It's not even as if his technique creates anything that looks like a neat ponytail. Instead, it's rather more a birds nest made of cotton candy.

"I'm not really sure that a brush couldn't have achieved that," says one of the presenters. I'm fairly sure that even if Palmer had been holding the brush, he might have done a better job.

It's true that YouTube is filled with videos of apparently sane dads not hurting their little girls with this technique.

It's also true that climbing a 50-foot tree and jumping off can be exciting.

This doesn't necessarily mean you should try it.