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The drawbacks of Indian outsourcing

IT line workers don't have their heads in the sand. It is not all sunshine, and it doesn't all work like Mr. Maheshwari states.

In response to the Perspective column written by Amit Maheshwari "When IT jobs disappear":

When are you going to publish an article stating who is losing money shifting work to India? Or how about a piece about U.S. workers who must come into the office at 9 p.m. to hold team conferences, because you can't call the Indian information technology worker at home?

Telecommunications are worthless in Indian residential neighborhoods. It took our team more than three months to ship a server to India and get it online. And we were one of the major IT companies in the planet.

Or how about the shifting of work to India and the laying off of the U.S. team that developed the application--which then had to train its replacements who had never before worked on the product? Oh, and while you're at it, why don't you write about the building of a complete duplicate of the infrastructure so that the Indian replacements can practice on it to the tune of several million dollars?

IT line workers don't have their heads in the sand. It is the CEO or chief information officer who's listening to the chief financial officer to cut money by shoving IT work to India for pure dollar savings. There are cases for this and cases where it does not work. Yet most companies are being driven by the hype to follow the herd. It is not all sunshine, and it doesn't all work like Mr. Maheshwari states.

William V. Grebenik
Colorado Springs, Colo.
President, Panthera Solutions