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Terra Lycos loses tech chief

Timothy Wright departs to join business applications provider Geac, becoming the latest high-level executive to leave Terra Lycos in recent months.

Terra Lycos Chief Information Officer Timothy Wright has left the company to take on the same role at applications provider Geac, becoming the latest high-level executive to leave the Internet company.

"Tim's technology leadership experience, coupled with an extensive knowledge of enterprise-level engineering and operations, make him an outstanding executive to lead and further focus Geac's product development efforts," Geac CEO Paul Birch said in a statement.

CNET News.com reported in November that Wright and the president of Terra Lycos? U.S. operations, Stephen Killeen, were poised to leave the company as early as the first week in December as friction mounted between the American unit and the headquarters in Spain.

Killeen resigned from Terra Lycos in late November to join online gaming site WorldWinner as its president and chief executive. Terra Lycos then eliminated the position of U.S. president and named Mark Stoever, former general manager of Terra Lycos' worldwide media-products unit, as executive vice president Terra Lycos U.S.

At the time of Killeen's resignation six weeks ago, Terra Lycos representatives said Wright would remain with the company as CTO. Terra Lycos officials did not return phone calls seeking comment Monday.

In a statement, Wright said he is "excited to help lead Geac's product direction and strategy as the company continues its corporate turnaround."

A number of U.S. executives have left Terra Lycos recently as more control has shifted to Spain. Terra Networks purchased Lycos two years ago in a $12.5 billion deal, marking the first time a foreign firm had bought a U.S. portal.

"I think part of the turnover in management seems to be a retrenchment in their business in North America," said Jeffrey Fieler, a Bear Stearns analyst. "For some individuals, it may seem like a good time to reassess where they are at."