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Applications

Sun buffs up its software array

Rivals and finances aside, CEO Scott McNealy says the only challenge facing the company is getting its message across to customers. Central to that message: Java.

In Berlin, CEO Scott McNealy says the only challenge facing the company is getting its message across to customers. Central to that message: Java.


At Sun's first European user conference, the company's top executive give the cold shoulder to critical comments.
December 4, 2003


The company plans to grab a bigger slice of the Java tools business by overhauling its NetBeans software and by improving how tools and code work together.
December 4, 2003


Sun hopes to make inroads on the enterprise desktop by slashing the price of its Java Desktop System, which is designed to replace both Windows and Office.
December 4, 2003


The company is seeking to build momentum in its programming tools business with updates to its different products.
December 3, 2003


Citing concerns over abandoning the NetBeans open-source community, the company decides not to join the IBM-backed Eclipse open-source effort.
December 3, 2003


Sun begins selling its first blade server that can run Linux, a move that tightens the company's ties with chipmaker Advanced Micro Devices.
December 3, 2003

previous coverage

These days, any news about Sun seems decidedly glum. In spite of it all, industry veterans say the company is hardly on the verge of collapse.
October 7, 2003