Tech Industry

Sun a step closer to mainframe turf

Nearly a year after Sun Microsystems' Sun Fire 3800, 4800, 5800 and 6800 servers arrived, the company has released technology that makes the high-end computers behave more like the IBM mainframe machines with which they're intended to compete. These Sun Fire models already had the ability to be sliced into several servers that would run at the same time, but until now the entire server had to be restarted to change how these partitions were established. With dynamic domain reconfiguration, resources such as memory, CPUs and input-output channels for the Sun Fire servers can be assigned on the fly. That means that one part of the server can grab more resources if its workload increases.

Nearly a year after Sun Microsystems' Sun Fire 3800, 4800, 5800 and 6800 servers arrived, the company has released technology that makes the high-end computers behave more like the IBM mainframe machines with which they're intended to compete. These Sun Fire models already had the ability to be sliced into several servers that would run at the same time, but until now the entire server had to be restarted to change how these partitions were established.

With dynamic domain reconfiguration, resources such as memory, CPUs and input-output channels for the Sun Fire servers can be assigned on the fly. That means that one part of the server can grab more resources if its workload increases.